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Disc Golfers!

Any plastic throwers out there? I posted a few pics of my swirly maggards brush along with a couple of swirly discs to our local club page but only the crickets responded....
 
I throw Trilogy plastic. I am definitely a noodle arm but have a great time. Played a few courses on the east coast.
 
Noodle arm is usually how I roll as well. I played as a teenager (~20 years ago) then set my discs off to the side up until earlier this year. I have a mixed bag of Innova and Trilogy and try to play a few times a week here in North Texas.
 
There's a pretty large, active group around here that use a bag tag system. I've played with doctors, pool cleaner guys, fence guys, nurses, teachers, well-to-do folk, and not so well-to-do folks. Once thing I've been a bit surprised is the percentage of pot smokers. I don't smoke the weed, but I'm not super opposed to it either. As a kid I wasn't into that nor were my buddies that played but I always heard about the stereotype. I now see that it's mostly true.

I just like being outside throwing round things at trees.
 
I am straight edge, but don’t care what others do with cannabis. Seems to be a big part of disc golf doesn’t it? Darn pesky trees keep jumping in the way.
 
I've only ever seen one course that had manmade goals (in northern New Jersey).
When I used to play, we'd just pick out trees or signposts.
 
I haven't played in ten years or so. But when my daughter was younger we used to play on weekends and free time. She found hiking boring. Disc golf kept her interest while getting some exercise. I used to take one of her friends on occasion which kept her interest. Today it is pretty hard to find activities that you can bond with your kids. This is a great one. I live in Massachusetts and there seems to be a dozen of courses in a short driving distance from Boston.
 
Reviving this old thread....

I've been playing for about 15 years and enjoy it much more than ball golf. More relaxing and less frustrating. I have a group of friends that play a few times every month. One of my friends has been a touring pro for quite some time too. We're a mixed bag of nuts comprised of engineers, underwriters, financial analysts, carpenters, mechanics and electricians.

Wisconsin has some amazing courses too.

I'm quite bad at it, but I enjoy the camaraderie and fresh air.

And no....I don't smoke pot.
 
I like to practice with the dog that lives here with us, but last week he literally chewed up my putter beyond any use. He's never done that before. But it wasn't an expensive one (Questat Crossfire) but I was used to it. I've got a Judge, but I preferred that Crossfire.
 

Whisky

Contributor
I plan on digging my disks out when the weather gets a little warmer. Just moved into a new house and there’s a course not too far away. I’m going to try and “jog” the course as I’m playing. I usually only run when I’m chased so I’m hoping the addition of slinging some disks will keep me moving.
 

ajkel64

The Aussie Bulldog
Moderator
Never heard of Disc Golf before. I have heard of Foot Golf played with a Soccer Ball. Very interesting.
 

Legion

Moderator Emeritus
I just watched a documentary called The Invisible String. Some cool history.

Ive never played, no courses where I live, but it looks like fun.
 
I just watched a documentary called The Invisible String. Some cool history.

Ive never played, no courses where I live, but it looks like fun.
It IS a lot of fun; it's also a lot harder than it looks. Throwing the discs is very different than throwing frisbees.


The two courses nearby my place aren't worth playing. I need to drive 45 minutes to an hour to get to some good courses.

The good thing is that it's pretty easy to simply go out and play and make up an impromptu course, picking out things for targets. As the ranges are far shorter than ball golf, a vast area is not necessary.

This is what I do for practice most of the time. Tee shots, approaches, all the same. The only thing missing is that satisfying jangle of the chains when your putter hits the goal.
 
Okay, back when dinosaurs walked the Earth, my brother and I would take our frisbees to the greenbelt, select a distant tree, choose a "par" and go for it, hitting the trunk was a sunk putt.

I gather these days the "discs" are mostly rings of varying size, stiffness, and weight?
 
Okay, back when dinosaurs walked the Earth, my brother and I would take our frisbees to the greenbelt, select a distant tree, choose a "par" and go for it, hitting the trunk was a sunk putt.

I gather these days the "discs" are mostly rings of varying size, stiffness, and weight?
Not just that, but different geometries. Some are intended (if you throw them correctly) to break right, others to break left, others to go straight..some are meant for distance (drivers) others for accuracy (putters.)

Believe it or not, there are more different types of discs than there are DE blades, and their different flight characteristics are actually quite pronounced.
 

ajkel64

The Aussie Bulldog
Moderator
Just had a Google of Disc Golf in Australia. It seems to be a growing sport with Championships as well. The nearest course to me is about 2 and 1/2 hours away. I might approach either the Golf Course here or the Local Council and see if that think it might be feasible to look at adapting part of the Golf Course or one of the local parks into a Disc Golf venue.
 
Just had a Google of Disc Golf in Australia. It seems to be a growing sport with Championships as well. The nearest course to me is about 2 and 1/2 hours away. I might approach either the Golf Course here or the Local Council and see if that think it might be feasible to look at adapting part of the Golf Course or one of the local parks into a Disc Golf venue.
My good friend is a professional disc golfer and has traveled the world playing tournaments including Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, Germany, Japan and several other countries.

It's absolutely a growing sport as it requires very little initial investment, it usually takes much less time than a round of ball golf and the courses typically have no fee or very small fees. Not to mention, it's a ton of fun.
 
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