What's new

Corrosion is not my friend

@ErieSurfer the more you tell us about how these two SR's were stored, the more I (and @Legion) think that this corrosion is being caused by something (a gas) being released by the plastic draw.

A draw or box of seasoned wood should solve your corrosion problem. Even a draw of a different type of plastic may work.

Some other suggestions:

IMG_20211122_180916.jpg

IMG_20211115_085257.jpg
 
@ErieSurfer the more you tell us about how these two SR's were stored, the more I (and @Legion) think that this corrosion is being caused by something (a gas) being released by the plastic draw.

A draw or box of seasoned wood should solve your corrosion problem. Even a draw of a different type of plastic may work.

Some other suggestions:

View attachment 1367509

View attachment 1367510
Be careful of the type of wood, it is not so simple.

Cedar, for example, releases quite corrosive fumes (which is why it is good for keeping bugs away). Also, varnishes, stains and treatments will not be chemically inert.

I had an expensive stainless steel watch stored in a nice cedar box, and on recent inspection there was a degree of oxidation. If it had been a carbon steel item, it would have been toast.
 
The conditions that cause Cell rot to kick off are moisture, heat, (direct sunlight or lighted case) and enclosed space. These are the exact conditions that exist in most Antique stores.

The formulation to create distinctive designs and colors are unknown today, but some combinations are notorious and worth keeping an eye on.

I find that simply lining the storage container with a clean paper towel and laying another paper towel over the razors will help remove moisture, even in un-temperature-controlled environment, like my shop.

Desiccant packets also work, and I use them for tool storage in toolboxes.

I have store plastic shoe boxes of razors in a closet in my home with the paper towel liners, un-oiled for years with no issues, but I live in a mild climate, California. Your conditions may dictate different storage precautions.
 
The top set of scales in post 15 is classic cell rot kicking off, note the rusty pivot pin and the discoloration near the pivot and wedge. That cracked ice pattern is notorious for cell rot.

I have seen a single razor in a display case at an antique store, eat all the metal items in a display case in a matter of months.

They should all clean up, but you will lose the etch. Start with 600 and see how deep the pitting goes.

Understood. I'll make a tracing of the scales and take some photos prior to throwing them out. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with me.
 
While we're on this topic, I've discovered active rust on a different razor. I am unable to differentiate celluloid from plastic, but I don't see any discoloration or 'cracked ice' in these scales. Do you believe these scales to be celluloid? Ignore the irregularly-shaped crud in the middle of the second photo. It was dried lather or similar junk that dislodged easily with a toothpick.

Do you believe the scales would be ruined if I submerged the pivot-end of the razor in WD40? If so, I'll unpin and work the rust separate from the scales.

20211124_182428.jpg

20211124_182501.jpg

20211124_182509.jpg
 
While we're on this topic, I've discovered active rust on a different razor. I am unable to differentiate celluloid from plastic, but I don't see any discoloration or 'cracked ice' in these scales. Do you believe these scales to be celluloid? Ignore the irregularly-shaped crud in the middle of the second photo. It was dried lather or similar junk that dislodged easily with a toothpick.

Do you believe the scales would be ruined if I submerged the pivot-end of the razor in WD40? If so, I'll unpin and work the rust separate from the scales.

View attachment 1367804

View attachment 1367806

View attachment 1367807
That is almost certainly celluloid.
 
Most vintage plastic razor scales are celluloid. You only ditch them if they go wrong, most don't. Just inspect the razors periodically, and if you do see evidence of rot, remove them right away.

Having said that, I've never, in the hundreds I've owned over the years, had one start rotting while I owned it. They have either showed up in job lots already rotting, or they have remained stable.
 
“Do you believe these scales to be celluloid?”

Yup, translucent and faux tortoise are the other two styles that are notorious. I have seen that particular inlay on other razors, and they are almost always cell rotted.

Some brands, like Double Ducks, actually most all the Duck line, Bresduck, Beau Brummel, and the Craftsman line are commonly cell rot prone.

The scales are bowed, and inlay is popping out, another indicator of early cell rot off gassing one scale has shrunk. They are beyond saving.

Too bad, those were some nice scales, love the color.
 
That now seeing the razors is the start of cell rot the off-gassing is causing the powder on the razor, I had one turned up here a Dubl Duck wonderedge when it arrived it had faint rust spots a good indicator that its starting cell rot see picture below

3.jpg

Lucky it was just starting on mine so removed the scales and made some that were close to the original

10.jpg20190606_235205.jpg

then I bought a razor that was too far gone but I wanted the inlays for a new set of scales this next razor is in the next stage of cell rot

1.jpg2.jpg

But I just wanted the inlays of that razor so removed them and the rest went in the bin

but this is just a mock-up to see where I need to remove some scale to fit the inlays

20190811_201850.jpg

That's what it will look like when finished but not enough time to get on with it

but this next photo is cell rot in full speed notice how the scales have gone bad and look at the razor

cell rot.jpg

also smell the scales if they have a vinegar smell that's one give-away for starting break down
 

FarmerTan

FarmerStan the Man
That now seeing the razors is the start of cell rot the off-gassing is causing the powder on the razor, I had one turned up here a Dubl Duck wonderedge when it arrived it had faint rust spots a good indicator that its starting cell rot see picture below

View attachment 1367967

Lucky it was just starting on mine so removed the scales and made some that were close to the original

View attachment 1367972View attachment 1367973

then I bought a razor that was too far gone but I wanted the inlays for a new set of scales this next razor is in the next stage of cell rot

View attachment 1367978View attachment 1367979

But I just wanted the inlays of that razor so removed them and the rest went in the bin

but this is just a mock-up to see where I need to remove some scale to fit the inlays

View attachment 1367982

That's what it will look like when finished but not enough time to get on with it

but this next photo is cell rot in full speed notice how the scales have gone bad and look at the razor

View attachment 1367984

also smell the scales if they have a vinegar smell that's one give-away for starting break down
THANK you for posting this! Looks like you will have a project on your hands, but what fun! Looks like a perfect choice for the new scales to me. Blessings on the work ahead of you, Dave
 
That now seeing the razors is the start of cell rot the off-gassing is causing the powder on the razor, I had one turned up here a Dubl Duck wonderedge when it arrived it had faint rust spots a good indicator that its starting cell rot see picture below

View attachment 1367967

Lucky it was just starting on mine so removed the scales and made some that were close to the original

View attachment 1367972View attachment 1367973

then I bought a razor that was too far gone but I wanted the inlays for a new set of scales this next razor is in the next stage of cell rot

View attachment 1367978View attachment 1367979

But I just wanted the inlays of that razor so removed them and the rest went in the bin

but this is just a mock-up to see where I need to remove some scale to fit the inlays

View attachment 1367982

That's what it will look like when finished but not enough time to get on with it

but this next photo is cell rot in full speed notice how the scales have gone bad and look at the razor

View attachment 1367984

also smell the scales if they have a vinegar smell that's one give-away for starting break down
Yah. In acetate film it is known as Vinegar Syndrome. When you walk into a vault full of effected reels it almost knocks you over.
 
Doesn't look like typical cell-rot to me. Patterning, texture and and coloration are different. If you had a razor with off-gassing scales, the steel of the blade in those scales would most definitely be affected in the typical manner and location. This looks like either the container, or a wrapper or perhaps a cleaner used in/on the drawers might be at fault. Could it be something else? Sure - but cell-rot would not be high on my list of suspects at this point in time. I could very well be Cell-Rot though, without chemical analysis there's no 'proof' of anything, only conjecture. But, to me, it looks like something else that I've experienced what was caused by improper storage in inappropriate containers.
Because of situations like this, I avoid storing most things in plastic anything most of the time. I've seen a lot of oddball out-gassing situations cause a lot of problems. I keep razors in cardboard or wood boxes meant to store steel items - tools. I used to use a silverware box with an anti-corrosion liner. I keep VCI in close proximity, or a camphor block. Mineral oil or Renwax on longer term storage blades. Blades in-use stay in open Simpson Brush boxes lined with VCI.
 
While I don't write terribly often in this forum, I do quite a bit of reading. Until this thread, I never came across a connection between the smell of vinegar and the decomposition of scales. I've just smelled the scales of some razors and found:

1) no odor from the Keen Kutter's scales.
2) vinegar odor from the Bengall's translucent yellow scales (pic 1, post 15)
3) no odor from the Shumate or Clover scales (pic 1, post 15)
4) no odor from the Sperry & Alexander (pic 2, post 15)
5) mixed odor results from the IrosKeen razor with the (post 26). My nose just can't decide...

It would seem there are multiple paths to identifying scale issues:
1) visual - 'cracked ice' appearance
2) visual - discoloration / color-shifting in the scales
3) visual - corrosion in the pivot
3) olfactory - vinegar odor

I've seen so many rusty razors for sale and wondered, "What are these folks thinking? Why would I buy this rusty thing?". Now I know that not all of those razors were rusty before they went into the display case.

I will include you all when I give thanks today. You are appreciated.

Now it's time to eat a bunch of turkey and have a nap!
 
Back in the day, there were many makers of Celluloid scales. Each had their own formulation for making the different patterns and colors, closely guarded. And today we have no idea what those concoctions were.

So, it is not surprising to see different off gassing results, especially when other oils and chemicals used on blades and scales. Not all cell rot off gassing smells and not all pattern. If you suspect cell rot at the least clean off the rust, separate from other razors and keep an eye on it.

It is also sad that some of the most spectacular scales are most likely to cell rot.
 
Top Bottom