What's new
  • Welcome back Guest!
    If you have been away from our site you may have to request a new password. Simply click on the link for "lost" password in the log in page.
    Thank you.
  • Guest
    The BST is now open, please note the changes in our guidelines to address the recent fraudulent activity. Ensure you read the guidelines prior to creating a sale thread in the Buy-Sell-Trade forum with special attention to the new photo and payment requirements.
    Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Corking ?

I've seen a couple of references to corking a blade. I assume this is running a blade thru a cork to take off any initial roughness.

Am I right?
 
Yeah, that's what people mean by corking. I wouldnt say it's at all necessary. It dulls the blade as well as smoothing it. So if the blades arent working initially, just switch brands. I dont understand why people do this, it's overkill.
 
How does one even do this? Seems a tad much.
+1. If a blade isn't smooth for me, out it goes. I'm with LeisureGuy on this (from his book); there are plenty of good blades out there, and it seems to be a hassle that I don't need. My Astra SP's and Super-Max Plats don't need corking; they work just fine.

Plus, there's the very real possibility that I'll screw up and slice my fingers/hand open. No blade is worth getting stitches for...
 
I looked this up because I was also curious about it.

Apparently, you take a new blade and gently lay its edge on a natural wine cork, DO NOT force it into the cork or try to slice into the cork. Then gently drag the edge along the cork, once in each direction for each edge. No pressure, it is supposed to smooth it up and get a blade to the second shave stage, if I understand it correctly.

I have not done this, but the second time I try a Derby blade I might. I got such a bad first shave with my first Derby I tossed it without even getting to shave 2.

If I don't understand this correctly, I'm sure I'll be corrected shortly. I'm curious about this and if anyone does it, also.
 
.
.
.


Apparently, you take a new blade and gently lay its edge on a natural wine cork, DO NOT force it into the cork or try to slice into the cork. Then gently drag the edge along the cork, once in each direction for each edge. No pressure, it is supposed to smooth it up and get a blade to the second shave stage, if I understand it correctly.
.
.
.
Like stropping but ALONG the edge rather than across it?
 
Not like stropping. If I understand it correctly you draw the blade edge along the cork as if you were trying to slice it, but with no pressure at all.
 
I always thought this was like palm stropping. Some people swear by it, but it never made a difference to me
 
+1. If a blade isn't smooth for me, out it goes. I'm with LeisureGuy on this (from his book); there are plenty of good blades out there, and it seems to be a hassle that I don't need. My Astra SP's and Super-Max Plats don't need corking; they work just fine.

Plus, there's the very real possibility that I'll screw up and slice my fingers/hand open. No blade is worth getting stitches for...
+2 why make crap dull crap? Just get a better blade.
 
with over 50 years of using a DE I have NEVER "corked" a blade. On the very rare occassion a new blade that felt rough or pulled was immediately replaced, never had 2 bad ones in a row; most blades are just fine and Bluebirds are worth twice their price. Never had a problem with Feather, Iridium, Shark, 7 O'Clock, Derby,Rapira, etc.
ken
 
For 10 or 20 cents a blade don't worry about it. Just throw the darn blade away. For a lot of people that DE shave, countless money is spent on creams, blades, soaps, paraphernalia...it's pointless in trying to save an extra nickel getting an extra couple of shaves out of a blade. I use 2 blades a week, get bbs most of the time, and enjoy my time doing it. Let me put it this way. A friend of mine at work asked me about why I DE. I told him I enjoyed it and it was cost effective. He said it sounded like a lot of work. I told him "well then, in that case, shaving was the only job I truly enjoyed."
 
I used to do this and kept a cork in the cabinet until a year or so back. But that was only for Derby blades - they are the only blade that I have ever felt the need to cork. Eventually I just put the blades in my tool closet and junked the cork.

I have heard of some people using a cork to take some of the bite out of a new Feather blade. I haven't bothered with this, but the idea seems sound. Sometimes the Feathers are a bit harsh during the first shave.
 
+1 on the Bluebirds, I haven't seen much written about them, but a really good blade! Got some in a PIF from Dublin.

So that's what it means.

Yeah, so many good blades. Why bother? If it works let the manufacturer cork them to make their crappy blade better. It's not worth the chance for blood IMO. Too many blades that work fine.
 
ddk13, you misunderstand the purpose of corking. It is not to get a couple extra shaves out of a blade. And klm099, while I respect your 50 years experience (which I certainly do not have), I submit you perhaps are being a bit doctrinaire in your response. Zarba, perhaps you are, as well.

Some folks here have noted that some blades give a wonderful 2nd and third shave after a pretty awful first shave. I don't know why, I am not a metallurgist, I don't go looking for microscope photos of blade edges, but I believe them when they write that because it is not a rare occurrence, apparently.

inspiringK 'gets it' when it comes to corking. The purpose is to gently smooth an edge--as gently as possible so as not to dull the edge or lessen the life of the blade--to nudge it to the second shave stage rather than suffering irritation on your face.

Like inspiringK, I am not a fan of the only Derby blade I tried, and I tossed it after the first shave figuring it was not worth it. Someone else posted that I should come back to it in a month or so and try to get to the second shave and my opinion would likely change. Interestingly, inspiringK felt that corking helped the Derby, and interesting to me in particular, it lines up with my feeling about that blade and I was considering corking the second Derby I tried. Now I definitely will.

My goal is to find a razor/blade combo I will like from the start, from the first shave. But one thing I've learned in my short time DE shaving is that there is an extremely wide range of experience between shavers and what works for one does not work for another. C'est la vie, apparently, when it comes to shaving.

While I have not dipped into the thread about using peanut butter as shave lather (I mean some things have to be seen as ridiculous by just about everyone), I have been amazed at the disparity of opinion here on cold water shaving. Wow! Talk about polar opposite techniques! But generally folks here say, "It's a YMMV thing, give it a try and see if it is for you."

Perhaps corking is in that category? I'm open minded about it. Although I tend to agree there are plenty of razor blades out there that don't give a lousy first shave, maybe the Derby, at least for some, is that magical blade that gives people just what they want in a shave except for that first few swipes of the blade ... which they tame by corking. I see no reason to suggest they should change their blade. If it works for them, well, it works for them, yes?
 
Top Bottom