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Cooking Techniques

I know some cooking basics and am able to prepare food from recipes ok, but I am interested in learning more about fundamental techniques. I bought the America's Test Kitchen Cooking School Cookbook, which is helpful. Do any of you know of any online schools you've tried, or other books that have been useful?
I learned a lot from the Aaron Franklin book. I think this book will help you.
 

oc_in_fw

Fridays are Fishtastic!
I learned to cook primarily by watching PBS cooking shows as a kid. I cannot recommend Jacques Pepin highly enough for learning just fundamental kitchen techniques. He also wrote a couple books on mastering French cuisine techniques, beginning with the fundamentals.

Martin Yan's old shows also showed some techniques for cooking Chinese food. For barbecue, Steven Raichlen's shows were really good about teaching techniques.

Unfortunately, most cooking shows today eschew showing technique in favor of something more akin to food porn and celebrity chefs.
And you can't beat Lidia's Kitchen for Italian. The PBS cooking shows are the best- too much yelling and general volume on Food Network shows, IMO
 
I am interested in learning more about fundamental techniques
Any techniques in particular?

I have a lot of the books mentioned above and have gotten a lot out of each, as I recall. Jacque Pepin is especially good on technique. I have not tried any online classes, but I suspect anything by America's test Kitchen is at least good.

Thee is probably nothing like in person classes. For one thing, you get to ask questions.

I agree that these days You Tube seems like a good place to start when it comes to figuring out how to do anything.
 

oc_in_fw

Fridays are Fishtastic!
Any techniques in particular?

I have a lot of the books mentioned above and have gotten a lot out of each, as I recall. Jacque Pepin is especially good on technique. I have not tried any online classes, but I suspect anything by America's test Kitchen is at least good.

Thee is probably nothing like in person classes. For one thing, you get to ask questions.

I agree that these days You Tube seems like a good place to start when it comes to figuring out how to do anything.
Seems the line “no, but I stayed in a Holiday Inn Express” can be replaced with “no, but I watched some YouTube videos”. :)
 
Salt, Acid, Fat, Heat by Samin Nosrat

The Making of a Cook by Madeleine Kamman

I was fortunate to see Madeleine speak and do a cooking demo in Boulder. One of my culinary heroes.
 
Well, for bread, The Bread Baker's Apprentice, 2nd edition by Peter Reinhart. A classic, updated. I'm fascinated by bread, and I learned so much reading Peter's books.

O.H.
 
Don't worry... I was just joking around. We both lived in Indonesia for a few years so we have several Indonesian cookbooks. And several great American cookbooks... French, Italian, Indian. This is going to sound a bit strange, but when my wife follows a recipe line by line, we seldom enjoy the meal. She's one of those amazing cooks who know just how to tweak the spices to get things just right. Maybe we just have the wrong cookbooks. We only have two shelves of cookbooks in one of our pantries... about 3' in length, though i have a dozen or so BBQ/Big Green Egg cookbooks in my own bookshelves.
I lived in Jakarta for 4 years and met my wife there - she's originally from Medan. Vastly underrated cuisine, mostly (I think) because it's "home cooking" and despite tasting great, it's not that pretty. Sri Owen has some great books on the food - we have 3, but mostly my wife makes her mother's food.

General cooking I would recommend Leith's "Food Bible".
 
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