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INFO! Check Six - Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month & PIF in Post #6

FarmerTan

"Self appointed king of Arkoland"
I'm due in another 3-5 years. One of the nurses when I was done the last time is a walking buddy (her and her husband), but she retired in January, so now I'm going to have to flash strangers.
I was recently graduated from nursing skool when I was admitted to the hospital for kidney stones. My poor nurse was a study buddy. A beautiful girl young enough to be my daughter.

I'm not sure which of us were more horrified with the shots for pain!

I'm one of the lucky ones: I get to do the poop in a jar and send it to the lab for analysis. I'm on Coumadin, and my doctor says the scope is a little bit dangerous for me.

I've done it twice now, just sent one in last month. I believe I'm on the every 5 years deal.
 

FarmerTan

"Self appointed king of Arkoland"
PIF Alert!

If anyone (i) schedules an appointment with their GP or Gastroenterologist, (ii) sees their GP or Gastroenterologist, or (iii) has a colonoscopy/endoscopy performed this month, I will enter you into a drawing to win a NIB Art of Shaving Tallow Shave Soap (unscented) with Wooden Bowl. B&B Honor Code applies here, gentlemen.

Phil's right, too many of us don't see a doctor, so that's why I'm expanding eligibility for this PIF. Go see your doc and take care of yourself. Too many people are counting on you being around for a long time.
Just noticed this my friend! Please don't consider me in this PIF. Someone else deserves it. MY test is easy.

I have a friend who was a nurse in the Endoscopy Ward.

He has no hangups with gas after that job. I loved my rotation in nursing skool when I visited that wing for the day. Sounded like the brass section of the orchestra after the procedure. People apologizing for the release of the effluence of the stuff we put up there made me feel good to be alive that day. It was a LOT more fun than studying!
 

luvmysuper

My Elbows Leak
I’ve read the probe can potentially damage the colon. Do any other less invasive comparable tests exist?
There are tests that can be done on stool samples for the folks who are considered low risk, unfortunately nothing yet replaces the colonoscopy for the higher risk group.
There's danger in every medical procedure, particularly those that involve anesthesia, but in the end... for me the risk is more acceptable than dying of colon cancer and the invasive procedures that are employed in the effort to save my life.
It's a trade off for sure, you just have to consider which risk group you might be in and see if it fits.

Sorry for the puns.
 
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I'd get a colonoscopy every year or two if I was allowed. The one day of awkwardness of worth it and it's a WIN no matter the outcome:
If they don't find anything..... WIN!
If they find something........... WIN! (as that's better than waiting a few more years for them to find it)
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
The first colonoscopy I ever had, I also was scheduled for an endoscopy. The Doc asked if I had any questions before they put me out and I asked him "Can you make sure you do the endoscopy first?"
Hey that happened to me too! :lol:

I was 20 I believe. Having lots of stomach issues. Doc decided to do an upper and lower to take a look. When I came to my mom asked how I feel and I said “I hope they did the upper first”. They didn’t find anything down under but said I had some small stomach ulcers.
 

luvmysuper

My Elbows Leak
Hey that happened to me too! :lol:

I was 20 I believe. Having lots of stomach issues. Doc decided to do an upper and lower to take a look. When I came to my mom asked how I feel and I said “I hope they did the upper first”. They didn’t find anything down under but said I had some small stomach ulcers.
I'm sure these guys have heard every possible joke a thousand times.
 
For those of you disinclined to get tested, Chadwick Boseman, aka the Marvel Superhero Black Panther was diagnosed with colon cancer at 39 and died at 43. I’m not quite old enough for it to be a thing I’m supposed to do (It’s more a follow up for something else) but I am older than he was when diagnosed. If a superhero can die of butt cancer so can you. The prep is no big deal as long as your couch is close to a toilet, and you’re knocked out for the procedure. Then you get brunch.
 
I've been "riding the stallion" every five years since I hit 45. I don't get a cocktail -- they zap me with an IV of Versed and Morphine. Wow. That right there is worth the ride!

Advice for the prep is to invest in a hand-held bidet. Washing off is less irritating than wiping off. A friend of mine wears sweats for his prep days, and simply steps into the shower and hoses off. They used to do a one-day prep which was kinda like "Let's see how fast we can clean this dude out." Now they do a more gentle one that takes a couple days but is much less uncomfortable. I'll take it every time over the old way.

Yes, there's a chance for the scope to do some damage. It's a small chance. Compared to dealing with advanced cancer, the risk is negligible.

Last time in three years ago they removed a polyp that put me in line for another ride in a couple of years. Considering the stakes in this game, you'll have WAY more problems going to the dentist twice a year than letting them go look for Amelia Earhart twice in a decade.

Jokes aside, just do it. Especially if cancer runs in your family.

O.H.
 
Had the endoscopy/colonoscopy combo in early 2021. All good. I seem to be the fortunate one here, since consistenly clear results and lack of family history with colon cancer have me on a 7-10 year cycle, with the occult blood test in my annual physical.

The kicker for me this time is my insurance wouldn't pay for the low volume prep treatment, only the gallon jug plan. Went out of pocket for the better prep. But it's still the most challenging part of the process.

But whatever you do, don't hesitate - Get the test.
 
Colon cancer took my dad at the age of 71. Believe me, you don't want to die from colon cancer. Get tested - regularly.

I've been on the 'frequent flyer' program since I was 40 years old.

Mine was 55. Between the colostomy and chemotherapy, the last year of his life was hell. We didn’t have the awareness back then like we do now. It doesn’t have to be that way anymore.
 
I’ve had 5 in the last 10 years. My first was back in 2000, an early screen since my family has a gruesome history of colon cancer. Clean as a whistle the first time. I waited 12 years to get another. I was afraid of what they would find. When I finally did it, they found 5(!) polyps, including one that looked like it came out of a circa 1978 Dungeons and Dragons Monster Manual.

Every 2-3 years since then and they have found polyps EVERY time. I’m happy they find them, believe it or not. That way I know they got it and it can’t hurt me. Catch them early and you don’t have to worry. Totally worth it.

And if the peace of mind is not incentive enough, here’s the soap waiting for one lucky person who sees a doc, schedules an appointment, or has a scope done this month.

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I was middle 30's when they found mine. They found it because of some bleeding. A polyp the size of a chicken heart. Invasive into the stalk and the colon wall. Lost a foot and a half of colon that day... and my hair within 2 weeks. have had a yearly scope since. It was only when I moved to Jersey that they knocked me out.

I'm one of the lucky ones..... GET CHECKED !!!!
 
March is colorectal cancer awareness month and screening saves lives.

Regular screening, beginning at age 45, is the key to preventing colorectal cancer. The recommended screening age was 50 but colorectal cancer rates are rising fastest among the under 50 age group. There are several screening options available so talk to your primary care provider. Colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms especially at first. I had none other than being tired which my primary care provider told me was because I was getting older. That is why getting screened regularly for colorect

March is colorectal cancer awareness month and screening saves lives.

Regular screening, beginning at age 45, is the key to preventing colorectal cancer. The recommended screening age was 50 but colorectal cancer rates are rising fastest among the under 50 age group. There are several screening options available so talk to your primary care provider. Colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms especially at first. I had none other than being tired which my primary care provider told me was because I was getting older. That is why getting screened regularly for colorectal cancer is so important. When caught early survival rates are very good. If you don't do it for yourself, do it for the ones that you would be leaving behind.
Colorectal screening saved my life. My cancer was caught as early as is possible to see. After chemo and radiation treatment, I have been cancer free for two years and the prognosis is terrific. Get screened for yourself, and for those you love.
 
I knew it was either 1-5 or 10yr repeat.....3??? must be a new "insurance" issue....; last 2 yrs ago, I am on the 5yr plan.
 
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