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Change of (Bird) Seasons

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Ambassador
With a series of birdfeeders, I've got a regular crew of avian diners the cat and I enjoy watching at close quarters.

Just now saw something new, ID'd as Downy Woodpecker, female. Black and white beauty, looks like a checkered racing flag, stripes on head.

This morning, another new bird: Carolina Wren.

Add in the buttafouoco hawk (misspelled) and a photo of hummingbirds I noticed from Sept. 14 of last year and it all adds up to: migration starting!

Birders: seen anything new?

AA
 

Alacrity59

Wanting for wisdom
Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
I saw the first Blue Jay of Sept. in the mirror while shaving. Wood peckers at our neighbour's feeder. Strangely a humming bird . . . seems late in the season for that.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Ambassador
I saw the first Blue Jay of Sept. in the mirror while shaving. Wood peckers at our neighbour's feeder. Strangely a humming bird . . . seems late in the season for that.
For us on the Gulf Coast, hummer migration is just about to begin.

Blue Jays are pretty much all summer, I think. They puzzle over my feeder but don't eat.


AA
 
I’ve noticed the Geese are forming up and doing their practice runs. Our bird feeder birds that show up when winter gets close are the black capped chickadees and the juncos. Neither of which have made an appearance. We are seeing more monarchs moving through.
 

JCarr

Contributor
I refilled the hummingbird feeder today. We've had several regulars throughout the summer. Expecting their departure for the season any day now. Sad to see them go. So much fun to watch them at the feeder. We have two Adirondack chairs on the porch about five feet from the feeder. It's great to sit on the porch and watch them come and go and come back. Really great.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Ambassador
I’ve noticed the Geese are forming up and doing their practice runs. Our bird feeder birds that show up when winter gets close are the black capped chickadees and the juncos. Neither of which have made an appearance. We are seeing more monarchs moving through.
Yes, the butterflies will be soon, early October I think.

Planted passionflower vine this year, and it always has gulf coast fritillary butterflies on it. They look similar to the monarch, but smaller.

AA
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Ambassador
I refilled the hummingbird feeder today. We've had several regulars throughout the summer. Expecting their departure for the season any day now. Sad to see them go. So much fun to watch them at the feeder. We have two Adirondack chairs on the porch about five feet from the feeder. It's great to sit on the porch and watch them come and go and come back. Really great.
you're just sending them our way, we'll feed them!

AA
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Ambassador
A rare occurrence yesterday. We had a visit from a woodpecker. The first one I have seen since moving to AZ.

View attachment 1175182
Looks like a Downy variant of some sort.

Experienced birders know this, but I didn't: when you switch types of feeders, you lose and gain birds.

Went to a tray-type to avoid so much waste and the woodpeckers couldn't figure it out. Gone.

Also. Nobody eats the round birdseed (millet?) in the blend. All they want is sunflower seeds and mealworms.

Really enjoy the titmouses and nuthatchers. The flying mice (house wrens) less so. Hogs and bullies.


AA
 

BigFoot

We Don't Smoke Marijuana In Muskogee!
Moderator
Up in Iowa at my inlaws I love watching the Orioles. That is just not a common bird you see sitting on a post somewhere.
 
On a real windy day around the end of september, we had a mass of bugs blow through. Gnats, midges, crane flies maybe.

I saw three red tail hawks, two monk parakeets, two nighthawks, two peregrins, three gulls together, a golden eagle, all flying ahead of the front, presumably catching bugs. The nighthawks and peregrines, also seen zipping at dive speeds just twenty feet off the patio, and right over my roof, where I could see bugs pouring over the peak, on the wind.

I love to hear nighthawk’s feathers when they pull out of dives, after hearing their chirps gain higher and higher altitude as they climb over a street lamp.

It wasn’t so odd to see any of them except maybe the parakeets, but that I saw all in a short period one evening was what impressed me.
 
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