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Cellar Wine

Hi Guys,

I've been thinking a bit lately about creating and building a wine cache. Both for enjoyment and financial reasons. I was talking to a client of mine and he was telling me about his cellar (currently contains 600 bottles) and that has got me thinking about doing the same.

Can anyone recommend a club/website that sends newsletters etc on recommendations for wine to cellar? Particularly in/for Aus?

Has anyone got a cellar happening? If so what is your reasoning? Is it for profit? Enjoyment? Both?

If you started it for a bit of financial gain... Did/does it really work? Some people seem to prefer buying wine over stocks etc...

Keen to hear some responses!

Cheers.
Nick.
 

Luc

"To Wiki or Not To Wiki, That's The Question".
I don't have any recommendations for a shop that would send you a newsletter no. I have a much smaller cellar but am in the progress of building another one. Where I used to live (10 years ago), I had one that was holding around 500 bottles.

The biggest plus is diversity. The biggest minus, you got more booze, it's easy to access, it's easy to drink.

I was making some on the side also (well, I still make some) so that helps. You can always get a special bottle if you find it for cheap and keep it for a special occasion. I know that some would buy them and re-sell them after a few years, I'm not that type of collector. If I never had a specific brand or label, I would drink with either family or friends.
 
I don't have a cellar myself but from my reading and research, the only reason I'd put one in is for personal collecting.
Calling it investing is a great way to justify all the money you spend on wine, but if you could actually make money at it is a different story. While a small amount might, I wouldn't think that the majority of people would benefit financially from from this.
I certainly wouldn't bet my retirement on it.
 
Good/average quality wine will not lose any quality if properly stored...the only thing is that it needs to be decanted after years of storing.
I have drank both Portuguese and French wines over 20+ years old and they were fine.
I love the brownish color of a good old wine!
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
For investment purposes ... if you intend to sell your carefully-preserved megastar wines at auction ... I'd say you need to invest in something elaborate that maintains temperature and humidity at near-ideal levels.

For private enjoyment, you can be a lot more rudimentary. IMHO this is a much better way to go.

I would think that less than five percent of all wine is suitable for long term cellaring, perhaps a lot less.

True.

Although, a good number of mid-range decent wines can benefit from a year in the cellar.
 
A few years ago I had to study some general wine stuff for work purposes.
I have learnt that most red wines can be stored for a period between 2 to 10 years at a temperature of about 12ºC and humidity around 65% to 75%. White wines should not be kept for more than 2 to 3 years.

It is also important to avoid direct sunlight and usually the best positioning of the bottles is horizontally.
Some 2 years ago my ex boss opened a few bottles he brought from France some 30 years ago and while some of them were still amazing wines and did benefit from the age,others were totally ruined.
 
Robert Parker (the wine guru) has a website for all things wine; he will sell you a subscription if you want access to the entire site. There is a link on his site (a freebie) to the "wine of the day" where he reviews one wine. The review includes his idea of the cellaring potential of the wine being reviewed. This might be an inexpensive way to start a cellar if you like his reviews. Check it out and see what you think.
 
For Australian wines (and they are probably the best for your purposes) try to read up on what James Halliday has to say. I have quite a large cellar and it is for financial purposes (ie in 10 years time I will be able to drink wine that is worth a lot more than I paid for it). The upside of my wine being downstairs is that it is accessible. The downside of my wine being downstairs is that it is accessible.

If you are serious about investing in wine and looking for a monetary return, speak to a good investment bank. I'm sure that they would have a product tailored to your needs- without the need to actually hold and care for the wine yourself.
 
Building a proper cellar takes a plan, time and education. Not something that should be rushed into and loaded up in one year.

What is the cellar going to reflect? Is it a hobby or an investment. I how much are you planning on putting out? If you are serious, a respected wine consultant can help you out better than, the wine spectator or Parker ever could.. The amount of manipulation that goes on in the wine world are geared toward using the rating system as a way to sell wine.
That being said wine makes a lousy commodity where most gains are lost paying the commissions at auction. Keep it as a hobby and have fun.
 
My wife and I have been collecting wine for personal consumption for about 11 years. Most of our wine is at an off site storage facility about 15 minutes from our house. It's temperature and humidity controlled. Our home cellar only holds 720 bottles and that's where we keep our ready to drink wine and hold a small amount waiting to go off site. It's a great way to always have an old vintage that's ready to drink. Last week we had a '98 BV Georges de Latour that was fantastic. It was purchased about 10 years ago for less than its worth today. I would recommend finding some wines you like and asking the wine maker about cellaring potential. That's where we got most of our information when we first started.
 
Hi Guys,

I've been thinking a bit lately about creating and building a wine cache. Both for enjoyment and financial reasons. I was talking to a client of mine and he was telling me about his cellar (currently contains 600 bottles) and that has got me thinking about doing the same.

Can anyone recommend a club/website that sends newsletters etc on recommendations for wine to cellar? Particularly in/for Aus?

Has anyone got a cellar happening? If so what is your reasoning? Is it for profit? Enjoyment? Both?

If you started it for a bit of financial gain... Did/does it really work? Some people seem to prefer buying wine over stocks etc...

Keen to hear some responses!

Cheers.
Nick.

I am a manager for Total Wine and More in a very rich area of the south (Boca Raton FL). We specialize in filling cellars. PM me with any questions.

As for wines, do not invest in whites. Many are ready to drink and do not hold a long life.

I would recommend wines from Bordeux, Burgundy or Rhone. These wines age very well and are an excellent addition to any cellar.
Some of my favorite areas:

Chateauneuf du pape Rhone France, easy drinking and you can cellar many of these wines for over 20 years. Great value, some of these wines have a 98 point rating and can be found under $100.

Saint Emilion Bordeux France, Great body, and alot of fruit. Pricing can go as high as $1500.

Stags Leap California, Best wines in the USA come from this very small area. Great cabs that wil out live the consumers.
 

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Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Saint Emilion Bordeux France, Great body, and alot of fruit. Pricing can go as high as $1500.

Sometimes even more.
full
 
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I have been cultivating a passion for wine for the last 35 years, I find it fascinating because the story of wine is the story of humanity. Wine touches so many spheres; geography, history, religion, gastronomy, literature, chemistry and you can go on and on. I consulted with a wine cellar designer years ago and he gave me the specifications so I could build it myself. it was a cool project and I was very happy with the final result; a small 800 bottles capacity passive cellar (no refrigeration), living in Montreal the cellar's temperature fluctuated slowly to the rhythm of the seasons from 12 to 19 degrees celsius with an average humidity level of 65%. Do not improvise, deal with professionals. One of the nicest aspects of having a cellar is to be able to taste a wine, that you bought several bottles of, and follow it's evolution as the years pass by. Also having a stash of wine that fits any mood or occasion is very practical. Investing in wine is like investing in art in my opinion, it should be considered as an investment in your quality of life not as a way to make money. Good luck with your project and let us know once completed. Oh, by the way give this forum a visit; http://www.wineberserkers.com/forum/ Cheers!
 
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