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Cast iron season question

Hey guys. If this has been answered just point me in the right direction, searching is hard via cell phone.

I bought a preseasoned lodge skillet a little while ago. I gave it another seasoning and cooked some bacon. I cleaned with salt an boiled some water, but despite this there is still a layer of brown crust on the skillet. I've tried to find some pics online but havent found much. Is this layer the start of a nice proper seasoning, or just left over crud from the bacon?

Any info would be much appreciated
 
After a quick hot water rinse, wipe it down good with paper towel and spray a little layer of vegetable oil on it and wipe down again before putting it away.
 
Hard to say. The brown crust could be bacon that's stuck to the seasoning or even rust.

I suspect it's the former, as the factory seasoning is pretty darn thick. I've found that a plastic scraper and plastic bristle brush will remove most stuck-on stuff.
 
Dude:
This Thread and Posted Replies 'link' with should answer all your questions and concerns. :ihih:

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php?t=185849

Christopher
proxy.php
 
If in doubt I scrub the pan clean and re-season with Crisco or similar, rub on a very very thin coat of grease and wipe off any excess then put in the oven for an hour or so at 350-375. Redo this at least 2-3 times with the thinnest possible coating of grease. After this just cook with the pan without scorching on med heat only and clean by heating water at a med temp and scrap to clean then wipe down if needed....this should be all you need to do for every day use. I normally only need to re-season every few years if ever following this.
 
You can also hit it with a scrub sponge like that used for washing dishes so long as it is a new sponge that has not had any contact with soap. Run the pan under some hot water and just use elbow grease to get out any remaining crud. Then hit it with a very small amount of oil and stick it in the oven. What I like to do is put it into a cold oven and then preheat it to 350. When it hits temp just turn it back off and let it coast down. That will do three things for you: 1. make sure any water on the surface of the pan is gone, 2. kill any remaining bacteria that survived the cleaning process, and 3. give the pan a nice fresh season anywhere where it is looking rough.
 
After a quick hot water rinse, wipe it down good with paper towel and spray a little layer of vegetable oil on it and wipe down again before putting it away.


If you are going to put it away for any length of time, do not use vegetable or animal oil, wipe it down with mineral oil. Vegetable oils will turn hard and gummy, animal oils will go rancid.
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
My thoughts on cast iron and black steel pans-

Just keep using them. The more you use them, the better they are. The less you use them, the more you have to worry about seasoning.
 
I tell my people to season them, then only and if it requires it, to use a non detergent SS pad for scouring, and water only if absolutely required, but never detergent or soap.

If the inside shows no sign of oil then grease or oil it before putting it away. Or make a mess of Roux. That always reseasons the pan and it's just a wipe to put it away.

A friend and I this past week went to a restaurant supply store 'cause he wanted a good fry pan and bought a Lodge 10". It was rougher than either of us liked on the inside, so when getting it back to my place, I put the sanding disk and backer on the grinder and in less time than it took me to write this had it as smooth as a babies bottom. There were still obvious casting divits that went inward, but the sand cast marks weren't pointing out anymore, so it was smooth. He used it and told me it worked fine after he washed it and reseasoned it.

If you know anyone with a 3 1/2-4 1/2" grinder (maybe a welder) even if you buy them what they need for their grinder to do the job you won't regret it. The cost won't be much and you'll get to use it for as long as you buy cast iron.

Just my $.02
 
i tell my people to season them, then only and if it requires it, to use a non detergent ss pad for scouring, and water only if absolutely required, but never detergent or soap.

If the inside shows no sign of oil then grease or oil it before putting it away. Or make a mess of roux. That always reseasons the pan and it's just a wipe to put it away.

A friend and i this past week went to a restaurant supply store 'cause he wanted a good fry pan and bought a lodge 10". It was rougher than either of us liked on the inside, so when getting it back to my place, i put the sanding disk and backer on the grinder and in less time than it took me to write this had it as smooth as a babies bottom. There were still obvious casting divits that went inward, but the sand cast marks weren't pointing out anymore, so it was smooth. He used it and told me it worked fine after he washed it and reseasoned it.

If you know anyone with a 3 1/2-4 1/2" grinder (maybe a welder) even if you buy them what they need for their grinder to do the job you won't regret it. The cost won't be much and you'll get to use it for as long as you buy cast iron.

Just my $.02

+1
 
Thanks guys. Some warm water and a scrubbing removed the nasty fairly easy, which leads me to think it was just bacon, as the pan is also still nice and black. Gonna use it again this week so I should see then. Thinking cornbread for superbowl:w00t:
 
I never ever boil water or use any soap in my pans. I only use a pan scraper and paper towel with hot water to clean If I ever screw up and get it too hot(that leads to a breakdown of the protective seasoning layer and subsequent sticking IMHO) I will scrub clean and re-season. Vegetable oil rubbed lightly placed up side down on foil in cold over heat to 350 for 1 to 1.5 hours.
 
I use boiled water all the time on mine and scrape with a spatula. Especially after cooking something fragrant like sausage and peppers. I don't see any ill effects, just rinse, heat till dry, and rub with oil. I never ever use soap though.
 

Isaac

B&B Tease-in-Residence
Here is what it was more than likely, Sugar. Today, with all the sugars in processed bacon, they usually tend to stick and burn to the pan regardless. As far as the seasoning, I wouldnt recommend Mineral Oil for any type of seasoning. Its ok to use some type of vegetable oil to season it, even if your going to store it for a bit. Lard is also a good alternative.

Once your seasoning is on there, and your having issues with "burned on" bits, after your done using the pan, fill it with very hot water. Your second best friend to the cast iron is a nylon scrubbing brush. This should take care of any stuck pieces.

Also, as someone mentioned, todays cast iron is pretty crappy. Vintage cast iron cush as griswold were leaps and bounds better than todays stuff. They were actually polished smooth, and once you start seasoning, they are much better at cleaning and becoming nonstick. If you have a modern version of cast iron, it probably wouldnt hurt taking a sander to it to polish the inside smooth. If you have any questions, please feel free to PM me.
 

Alacrity59

Wanting for wisdom
I tell my people to season them, then only and if it requires it, to use a non detergent SS pad for scouring, and water only if absolutely required, but never detergent or soap.

If the inside shows no sign of oil then grease or oil it before putting it away. Or make a mess of Roux. That always reseasons the pan and it's just a wipe to put it away.

A friend and I this past week went to a restaurant supply store 'cause he wanted a good fry pan and bought a Lodge 10". It was rougher than either of us liked on the inside, so when getting it back to my place, I put the sanding disk and backer on the grinder and in less time than it took me to write this had it as smooth as a babies bottom. There were still obvious casting divits that went inward, but the sand cast marks weren't pointing out anymore, so it was smooth. He used it and told me it worked fine after he washed it and reseasoned it.

If you know anyone with a 3 1/2-4 1/2" grinder (maybe a welder) even if you buy them what they need for their grinder to do the job you won't regret it. The cost won't be much and you'll get to use it for as long as you buy cast iron.

Just my $.02

I agree 100% . . . the Lodge pan I bought was just prickly inside . . . it would actually noticeably wear down the spatula I was using. A bit of sanding . . . well a bit more investment of time as I don't own a grinder and actually used a palm sander.
 
I agree 100% . . . the Lodge pan I bought was just prickly inside . . . it would actually noticeably wear down the spatula I was using. A bit of sanding . . . well a bit more investment of time as I don't own a grinder and actually used a palm sander.

Be careful sanding. You need to leave the valleys and just remove the peaks. Absence of texture makes cast iron difficult to season.

Soap or detergent is OK on a properly seasoned pan. Hand wash and dry immediately, do not soak.

Phil
 
I recently used Crisco to season a skillet-seemed ok. I agree, tons of bacon and USE is the best seasoning.

If using Crisco, MELT IT before applying.

Flaxseed oil has been getting alot of love recently for seasoning.
 
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