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Can anyone tell me about this?

I acquired this hone today from my father. It's in pretty rough shape. I'm not sure what it is or if it can be used on straight razors. I am using my brand new Norstrand #60 flattening stone on it and it's going very slowly.

I was wondering if anyone knows what type of stone it is and is it a good idea to use the type of flattening stone I'm using on it?
 

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I acquired this hone today from my father. It's in pretty rough shape. I'm not sure what it is or if it can be used on straight razors. I am using my brand new Norstrand #60 flattening stone on it and it's going very slowly.

I was wondering if anyone knows what type of stone it is and is it a good idea to use the type of flattening stone I'm using on it?
 

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David

Ask me which is more painful!
Moderator Emeritus
Can’t tell much, but based on those pics I’d say it’s an India oilstone. Post a few more pics of the sides and surface.
 

Legion

Moderator Emeritus
Looks like a synthetic oil stone.

Give it a good squirt with oven cleaner, let it sit, then scrub with a brush and water (use gloves, and do it outside).

Bet it comes out brown/orange colour.
 
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Looks like a med grit Carborundum to me. But yeah - as noted by everyone already - needs to be cleaned to get a better/more reliable ID.
 
Looks like a med grit Carborundum to me. But yeah - as noted by everyone already - needs to be cleaned to get a better/more reliable ID.
I've got it soaking in water now. I hope I didn't mess up/contaminate the brand new lapping stone I got by going to work on it.

Its definitely much more coarse than my Franz Swaty which is all I have to compare it to. Probably great for pocket knives.
 
If it is oil/gunk clogged (looks like it), soaking in water won't have too much effect. Submerging it in a petroleum solvent like Kerosene, is the typical treatment.
Oven cleaner can work too, EZ Off (yellow can) but you should to neutralize the stone in a Baking Soda bath for a long while afterwards.
If that is a carborundum, the work needed to clean it up might not be worth it; they're pretty common and not particularly valuable. If it is a family heirloom, that's another story and any work put into it will be worth it.
 

Legion

Moderator Emeritus
Stop putting it onto your lapping stone until all the oil is removed. Water will do nothing. Oven cleaner stripped the last one I cleaned. Not that it was worth the effort, because it was no use for razors
 

SliceOfLife

Contributor
I may be crazy but I think I see Hindostan banding in the picture. Still not a great razor stone, but finer than a carbo/india would be if I'm right.

Like others have said, soak it in simple green or some other degreaser, water won't do much.
 

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