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Butterscotch

Not sure I understand the issue completely, but I've left out Dan's translucent and black hard Arkansas oil-stones out with standing oil on the surface, and in returning later, some of the oil would be absorbed. From this, I would be inclined to think they are somewhat porous; and with water, I would think the effect would take place more quickly. Vermont slate, by way of comparison, is not porous at all. Standing oil will stay there for days. Maybe that's why the latter works well for roofing purposes. Too bad your metal box isn't a sharpening stone. It looks great.
 

duke762

Contributor
Has anyone ever seen a brand new butterscotch trans? I would expect them to show up in Dan's True Hard classification possibly? Wish his site had more pictures. The vintage ones posted here are stunning!!
 
Actually, when I don't use mine for a long period, the surface doesn't wet properly. It takes some soap to get it wet.

And when I got the hone there was no trace of oil...

If they are really sightly porous, could it be that those are normal translucent treated with oil? a bit like the turkish oil stones, boiled in oil...

Or heat treated?
 
Wish his site had more pictures. The vintage ones posted here are stunning!!
Bump for a worthy stone

A few stones I rescued recently. Top left is one I already had and the other two are new acquisitions. Two are 7x2 and the largest is 8x2. Beautiful stones

ADB5B26F-32B8-4617-8813-5AC20DE22014.jpeg
 

duke762

Contributor
Those are stunning!!!! Wish I had half the luck you have for digging up gems! Some day, some day, I hope to score one.
 

Dcaddo

Moderator Emeritus
Wow that’s a beauty, Keith. I still don’t believe these colors are caused by oil I think I thats their original color. That’s a prime example of a butterscotch trans
 
It's funny to hear a butterscotch colored stone described as "buttery". Sort of a preconditioned perception based on color.
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Contributor
Ambassador
It's funny to hear a butterscotch colored stone described as "buttery". Sort of a preconditioned perception based on color.
Still, probably accurate. I'd call my non-butterscotch translucent buttery (an extremely hard butter).

Anybody think the butterscotch hones better than or substantially different from other translucents?

Happy shaves,

Jim
 
Slightly buttery. Norton Behr 1950s Hard Ark on top, freshly lapped ancient Pike Hard Ark below.
Absolutely outstanding, beautiful stones

Anybody think the butterscotch hones better than or substantially different from other translucents?

Jim
I have several butterscotch that I absolutely enjoy using. It would be equivalent to driving a Ferrari and a Rolls-Royce. They both get you there, but into two different styles
 
Wow that’s a beauty, Keith. I still don’t believe these colors are caused by oil I think I thats their original color. That’s a prime example of a butterscotch trans
The presence of oil in/on the stone has a part in the coloring. How big a part, I am unable to say. But oil is, for sure, a player in the story. I cut a piece off the buttery one... got a good view of the cross section and the surfaces of the stria left by the saw blade.

Not recording any quantifiable working differences between the buttery stones and the pure white ones. Been running side by side tests with identically lapped working surfaces.
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Contributor
Ambassador
The presence of oil in/on the stone has a part in the coloring. How big a part, I am unable to say. But oil is, for sure, a player in the story. I cut a piece off the buttery one... got a good view of the cross section and the surfaces of the stria left by the saw blade.

Not recording any quantifiable working differences between the buttery stones and the pure white ones. Been running side by side tests with identically lapped working surfaces.
Thanks, Keith. Good information. Experience tells.

Happy shaves,

Jim
 

Dcaddo

Moderator Emeritus
The presence of oil in/on the stone has a part in the coloring. How big a part, I am unable to say. But oil is, for sure, a player in the story. I cut a piece off the buttery one... got a good view of the cross section and the surfaces of the stria left by the saw blade.

Not recording any quantifiable working differences between the buttery stones and the pure white ones. Been running side by side tests with identically lapped working surfaces.
Very Interesting. I’ve been tempted to do the same but the cutting scared me away. How did you cut it?
 
The presence of oil in/on the stone has a part in the coloring. How big a part, I am unable to say. But oil is, for sure, a player in the story. I cut a piece off the buttery one... got a good view of the cross section and the surfaces of the stria left by the saw blade.

Not recording any quantifiable working differences between the buttery stones and the pure white ones. Been running side by side tests with identically lapped working surfaces.
Very Interesting. I’ve been tempted to do the same but the cutting scared me away. How did you cut it?
Post #34 of this thread. One piece of a interestingly complex puzzle
 
I have a 6x2 mostly white/grey, an orange line down the diagonal, and partially buterscotch on the side. The more I look at it, the more I think the colour is natural, not induced.
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Contributor
Ambassador
Throw any ark in a pail of simple green long enough and it is a green lie detector about the true color.
Maybe if I throw my Hard Black Arkansas into a pail of simple green for a few weeks it will turn into a Hard Translucent Arkansas?

That would be a good trick.

Happy shaves,

Jim
 
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