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Boot Camp

Well my brothers joined the army and I just heard from him for the first time since he went to do his 3 months basic training and he is angry already :rolleyes:

Apparently even though he already had a regulation haircut they charged him for a compulsory haircut upon arrival anyway and just didn't shave his head since it was more than short enough already. He said he knew it was going to be tough since the whole point is to try and break you but he didn't expect to be ripped off.
 
He should just tell them to **** off. See if that works and make sure that you let us know.:lol:

When I was in the Army I paid for my haircuts and had one once a week. They took about 2 minutes and cost me 25 cents (not a misprint). Oh yeah, that was in Korea and the year was 1962.

edit: The year was 1961 - Had a senior moment there.
 
Well my brothers joined the army and I just heard from him for the first time since he went to do his 3 months basic training and he is angry already :rolleyes:

Apparently even though he already had a regulation haircut they charged him for a compulsory haircut upon arrival anyway and just didn't shave his head since it was more than short enough already. He said he knew it was going to be tough since the whole point is to try and break you but he didn't expect to be ripped off.
Hah! Your brother DID get ripped off.

He should have joined the Navy ... they give your first haircut FREE! Every one after that was $2 (1975 prices,) except when your onboard a ship ... when they're FREE!

Even with the offer of FREE haircuts, a lot of sailors went to a civilian barber when ashore, and paid through the nose to have their hair cut by an attractive woman rather than a grumpy old guy.

P.S. On behalf of all the veterans here, please thank him for His Service to His Country.
 
I know they aren't really trying to break you Anton, its just an expression of how tough it can be. And I don't know who much a tank ride is but a haircut is A$6.50
 
Been there, done that. Went to OSUT(basic and AIT combined) with a brand new pair of premium running shoes of the the proper type for my feet, that I had bought at a running store and I still had to buy a pair when everyone else did at reception. I think they do these things to end discussion more than break you. If the Drill Sergeants entertained a discussion from one Pvt. they would be entertaining debates with the whole company, so it's just easier to have everyone get a haircut, new sneaks, etc.. Plus it's all about uniformity. Don't sweat it though it will be over for him soon and be left with nothing but fond memories of the whole experience, btw I'm not joking. Just remember this conversation when he starts telling you how much fun he had in a few months.
 
I believe the trauma of seeing myself in the mirror after my boot camp haircut far outweighed any concern I had about whether I paid for it or not. :biggrin:
 
Been there, done that. Went to OSUT(basic and AIT combined) with a brand new pair of premium running shoes of the the proper type for my feet, that I had bought at a running store and I still had to buy a pair when everyone else did at reception. I think they do these things to end discussion more than break you. If the Drill Sergeants entertained a discussion from one Pvt. they would be entertaining debates with the whole company, so it's just easier to have everyone get a haircut, new sneaks, etc.. Plus it's all about uniformity. Don't sweat it though it will be over for him soon and be left with nothing but fond memories of the whole experience, btw I'm not joking. Just remember this conversation when he starts telling you how much fun he had in a few months.
Sneakers? Running shoes? We always ran wearing combat boots. It's no wonder that people enlist - soft life, travel, salary, benefits and .............running shoes.:001_smile:001_smile
 
Boots are for road marches, and you still get to run in them plenty and beat the hell out of your lower extremities. But I think running shoes are a great idea for PT running when you consider what the Army spends on getting and training people. Got to protect your investments. Plus train like you fight means if I'm going to take a PT test in running shoes might as well train in running shoes.
 
M

modern man

Hummm.

First day they shaved my head (free)

Before boot camp graduation I got a hair cut (free) although I think they took it out of my seabag allowance.

Went to the ship (free hair cuts)

Army gets hosed but I bet it is better then letting a 19 year old kid try and give you a fade with sheep sheers. :lol:

Sneakers? Running shoes? We always ran wearing combat boots. It's no wonder that people enlist - soft life, travel, salary, benefits and .............running shoes.:001_smile:001_smile
Shin splints became a problem (OK more people became wimps) so they put them in tennis shoes.

I did everything in boondocks aside from PT testing and scheduled PT.


I remember my first BOHICA incident.

I was one of the last to get issued "dungarees". A few months after leaving boot camp they made the switch to "utilities". Guess who had 3 sets they couldn't trade in and had to pay for the new issue.
 
Just kidding guys.

I actually received 2 pairs of brown boots and black dye when I enlisted in 1960. The Army had converted from brown boots to black boots and in a fit of practicality decided to have the brown boots dyed rather than just dispose of them. I have very clear memories of sitting outside the barracks at Fort Dix, NJ, waiting for the events that a new recruit experiences, test, shots etc, making my brown boots black. The PA system (***** box) would periodically announce, "get your hands out of your pockets, soldier" to no one in particular. Oh yeah, the weather was nice - it was June and the first haircut was free. Pay was $76 a month.
 
Sneakers? Running shoes? We always ran wearing combat boots. It's no wonder that people enlist - soft life, travel, salary, benefits and .............running shoes.:001_smile:001_smile
Yeah, what's this 'running shoes' stuff? I came off the bus at a run, and didn't stop running until graduation from basic training. Ran to chuch, to sick call, to the chow hall, to formations, ...to...to...to... All done in boots.

-- John Gehman
 
Yeah, what's this 'running shoes' stuff? I came off the bus at a run, and didn't stop running until graduation from basic training. Ran to chuch, to sick call, to the chow hall, to formations, ...to...to...to... All done in boots.

-- John Gehman
You tell em' John. Bunch of candya$$es.:lol:
 
Sneakers? Running shoes? We always ran wearing combat boots. It's no wonder that people enlist - soft life, travel, salary, benefits and .............running shoes.:001_smile:001_smile
Not having special footwear is why I couldn't stay with the Marines. I have flat feet, which can cause serious lower back pain. Also, I grew so fast that my tendons and ligaments couldn't keep up. It made bending at the knees very painful at times. I would've needed expensive shoes and/or orthotics. Obviously, the Marines weren't going to pay for it. :frown:
 
When I enlisted back in '92 we paid $4.25 for haircuts on post. We also purchased running shoes from the mini-PX at the reception battalion. If I recall correctly we were "advanced" $140 on arrival and any items purchased were paid for from that.

I remember coming home on leave and going to hair salon and asking how much for a haircut. I was told $18. I replied that I didn't have $18 worth of hair.

When I got to Fort Hood haircuts were $3.75 and we had a pretty decent barber in the little barber shop/PX over on West Fort Hood. I never went downtown much for a cut, but this one shop with some little Korean girls did wonders for $15.
 
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