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Boo

emwolf

Contributor
Only the second time Lugosi played Dracula. We tend to think he played the Count in a long series of films, but there were only two. And I think this was Chaney's last outing as Larry Talbot, the definitive screen wolf man.

There's a funny exchange between Abbott's character and Costello's, where Abbott points out how he has always shared girls with Costello. "Didn't my girl bring along a friend for you?" "Yeah, and she was so cute with her wooden leg." Only that's not the exact dialogue. Anybody remember?
Lugosi didn't play Dracula as often as John Carradine did, 2 of which were part of the Universal Classic Monster series (House of Frankenstein and House of Dracula).
 
While Lon Chaney, Jr. will always be my favorite werewolf, I have my DVR set to record THE WEREWOLF (1956) on TCM Oct 25. That one is memorable for me because, as a 9 yo, I told my mom I was walking into downtown Perth Amboy to see a Fireman's Parade. Instead I skipped the parade, bought a ticket for the Royal theater and sat through several showings of The Werewolf. I got home late, as usual, and told my mom the parade ran long. It was great to be a latchkey kid in the 50's, despite the occasional run-in with mom's cat o'nine tails.

My favorite werewolf book, if you can find a copy, is The Wolfen. The movie sucked, but the book was great.
 

BigFoot

Sheena is a Punk Rocker!
Moderator
My favorite werewolf book, if you can find a copy, is The Wolfen. The movie sucked, but the book was great.
I used to have that book Brian. I will have to look and see if I still do. It was a really great story with a whole new twist on werewolves, or really wolves. Some of the details almost made it believable enough to look over your shoulder.
 

emwolf

Contributor
While Lon Chaney, Jr. will always be my favorite werewolf, I have my DVR set to record THE WEREWOLF (1956) on TCM Oct 25. That one is memorable for me because, as a 9 yo, I told my mom I was walking into downtown Perth Amboy to see a Fireman's Parade. Instead I skipped the parade, bought a ticket for the Royal theater and sat through several showings of The Werewolf. I got home late, as usual, and told my mom the parade ran long. It was great to be a latchkey kid in the 50's, despite the occasional run-in with mom's cat o'nine tails.

My favorite werewolf book, if you can find a copy, is The Wolfen. The movie sucked, but the book was great.
I always thought Oliver Reed made a mighty fine werewolf too.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
Only the second time Lugosi played Dracula. We tend to think he played the Count in a long series of films, but there were only two. And I think this was Chaney's last outing as Larry Talbot, the definitive screen wolf man.

There's a funny exchange between Abbott's character and Costello's, where Abbott points out how he has always shared girls with Costello. "Didn't my girl bring along a friend for you?" "Yeah, and she was so cute with her wooden leg." Only that's not the exact dialogue. Anybody remember?
I'm sure a lot of people know that the actor who played Frankenstein was Glenn Strange, who also played Sam the Bartender on Gunsmoke.

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emwolf

Contributor
my 5 year old grandson has fallen in love with the 1940's Mummy series (he keeps saying the mum-aaaaayyyy). He asks why they're all gray and black and white? I've got the Abbott & Costello Meet the Mummy on the way to the house to finish my collection. I hope he enjoys this one too.
 
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