What's new
  • Guest
    As per our long standing policy of not permitting medical advice on the forum - all threads concerning the Coronavirus will be locked.
    For more info on the coronavirus please see the link below:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

Bialetti Moka technique question ...

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
I recently purchased a Bialetti "Moka Pot" coffee maker and have been enjoying it greatly. Thanks @Marco et al. for the recommendation!

Earlier today in one of the Bialetti discussions here, I saw a comment about the temperature used to make the coffee ... the poster basically said that he used a lower temperature, with the result being that the coffee grounds were not "cooked" in the brewing process, resulting in a less-bitter cup.

Does anyone have similar experiences, or other experiences with various heat levels and the results? What heat gives you the best result with your Bialetti? For the record, mine is a "6-cup" version, which makes enough to fill a normal "coffee mug" with a touch left over.
 
This is by no means a scientific response. I've tried with both cold and hot water. I found the cold water to yield a bit stronger flavor which I prefer.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

Marco

B&B's Man in Italy
Ambassador
I recently purchased a Bialetti "Moka Pot" coffee maker and have been enjoying it greatly. Thanks @Marco et al. for the recommendation!

Earlier today in one of the Bialetti discussions here, I saw a comment about the temperature used to make the coffee ... the poster basically said that he used a lower temperature, with the result being that the coffee grounds were not "cooked" in the brewing process, resulting in a less-bitter cup.

Does anyone have similar experiences, or other experiences with various heat levels and the results? What heat gives you the best result with your Bialetti? For the record, mine is a "6-cup" version, which makes enough to fill a normal "coffee mug" with a touch left over.
Doc, when using a Bialetti Moka Pot there are 3 elements to keep in mind:

1. The right water/ coffee powder proportion. If you don't get this right your coffee won't be "great": too much water and the coffee will be overly light, watery and without taste - too much coffee powder and it will be overly strong and bitter.
Just put tap water in the bottom container barely touching the valve, no more no less. And fill entirely the funnel with quality coffee powder. For a full bodied taste give one press with a teaspoon and add just one more teaspoon of powder.

2. Low temperature or low cooker flame. The coffeee needs to come out slowly in order to become tasty and good.

3. Quality coffee beans, properly grounded for Moka Pot
(self-explanatory).

I hope this helps, Doc. Here at your disposal for any further question. Just ask, my friend. :)
 

ajkel64

Moderator
Thanks for the explanations @Marco the first Moka Pot that I ever bought was a single cup espresso. I didn’t have a cup small enough as we had all large coffee mugs. I kept filling mine up over the valve and wondered why I water would leak out where the bottom screwed to the top. Once I bought a small enough cup and saucer from the Op Shop and dropped the water level under the valve all went well.
 

Marco

B&B's Man in Italy
Ambassador
@ajkel64 Using a Moka Pot is not difficult at all, but you need to keep in mind the "little tricks" mentioned above. ;)
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
Doc, when using a Bialetti Moka Pot there are 3 elements to keep in mind:

1. The right water/ coffee powder proportion. If you don't get this right your coffee won't be "great": too much water and the coffee will be overly light, watery and without taste - too much coffee powder and it will be overly strong and bitter.
Just put tap water in the bottom container barely touching the valve, no more no less. And fill entirely the funnel with quality coffee powder. For a full bodied taste give one press with a teaspoon and add just one more teaspoon of powder.

2. Low temperature or low cooker flame. The coffeee needs to come out slowly in order to become tasty and good.

3. Quality coffee beans, properly grounded for Moka Pot (self-explanatory).

I hope this helps, Doc. Here at your disposal for any further question. Just ask, my friend. :)
Thank you!

#1 I was already doing, and we share a passion for #3.

But I had been doing the opposite of #2 ... I will lower the temperature and enjoy the results!
 

Marco

B&B's Man in Italy
Ambassador
Thank you!

#1 I was already doing, and we share a passion for #3.

But I had been doing the opposite of #2 ... I will lower the temperature and enjoy the results!
You're very welcome, my friend. :thumbsup:
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
I hope this helps, Doc. Here at your disposal for any further question. Just ask, my friend. :)
I hope all is well with you ... or as well as can be expected in current circumstances.

I've been really enjoying my Bialetti Moka. Basically following all of your suggestions.

One additional thing I've done a few times is to add a healthy dash of ground cinnamon on top of the coffee grinds right before assembling the pot. This adds a nice cinnamon note to the coffee!
 

Marco

B&B's Man in Italy
Ambassador
I hope all is well with you ... or as well as can be expected in current circumstances.

I've been really enjoying my Bialetti Moka. Basically following all of your suggestions.

One additional thing I've done a few times is to add a healthy dash of ground cinnamon on top of the coffee grinds right before assembling the pot. This adds a nice cinnamon note to the coffee!
Doc, given the circumstances we are all well - thanks God. The elders say that a similar tragedy here in Italy was only seen during WWII...

Yes, the cinnamon is a nice way to create a more tasty coffee, of course if you like cinnamon. Another traditional alternative would be to mix your coffee, once poured in the cup, with liquid chocolate. You can also put some fresh cream on the top, creating a "mini-cappuccino". Or you can even do both!
 
I’ve recently started using my moka pot. I use hot water in the pot and heat up the water at a medium-low/low medium temperature. Works well for me.

73660E77-A0FB-46DB-B59F-8782090AD62E.jpeg
 
Top