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Beginner Coffee Questions

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
dang, now I have to get one. couldn't you let me have my delusion?:sleep:
I'm sure someone (possibly the inventor of this device) will chime in and tell me I'm wrong, but I find the Aeropress works best, by far, for producing a single, small, concentrated cup. It seems that the less water you use, the better the brew.

Now Alan has to create a giant Aeropress with a great big plunger that will make 16 ounces at a time.:001_tt1:

Buy one- you'll be pleased.
 

Scotto

Moderator Emeritus
I'm sure someone (possibly the inventor of this device) will chime in and tell me I'm wrong, but I find the Aeropress works best, by far, for producing a single, small, concentrated cup. It seems that the less water you use, the better the brew.

Now Alan has to create a giant Aeropress with a great big plunger that will make 16 ounces at a time.:001_tt1:

Buy one- you'll be pleased.
My experiences mirror yours.
 
+1 for Sweet Marias. Have been using their green coffee beans and roasting my own for about 6 years now.

Find some high quality decaf and see if you like it. If you do, I would suggest roasting your own. Check out Sweet Marias for information and a source of green beans. You don't have to invest a whole lot if you don't mind experimenting and taking some time to learn. Home roasting can be done with something as simple as a cast iron skillet.

I bought my parents an air roaster a few years ago. It was a risk as they aren't gadgety types. It was one of the best things I've ever given them. They regularly order green beans from Sweet Marias, both regular and decaf. A couple of the decafs I have had at their house have been some of the best cups of coffee I've ever had.
 
I have an AreoPress at home and one at work. I'm the only one that drinks coffee at home. The free coffee here is horrible and the Starbucks for sale they have in the cafe is not my first choice either. Quality is not the same as in the stores and the cost is prohibitive. I get a lot of stares and questions when I make coffee in the break room. Not to mention positive comments on the aroma. I store my coffee in a canister since using a grinder at work is out. Anyone have a really good ground coffee canister to keep the coffee fresher?

As far as trying coffee is concerned, you might want to go to a store that lets you fill a bag with beans and you pay by the ounce. They usually have a grinder there too. That way, you can sample a couple ounces of a dozen different coffees to get an idea of what you like. Not all at once of course. Anybody know if Trader Joes has decent coffee? One just opened near me.
 
Anyone have a really good ground coffee canister to keep the coffee fresher?
Never tried this, but I just thought of the idea and it may help you out for the office...

Try getting a clean (or new) wine bottle and use a vacu-vin to vacuum seal it after each use. Linky

Of course, you'd need a funnel to get the grounds into the wine bottle, but it would be an easy, controlled pour to get them out.

A half-bottle or even beer bottle would work as well.
 
I use Mason jars.
Either screw top or latch-type work very well.
Hide them in cool, dark corners
-------------------------------------------------
I use mine the same evry time.....lately.
4 rounded TSP(FINELY) coffee and hot water poured up to the "4".
I cannot imagine a better cuppa Joe.
 
Never tried this, but I just thought of the idea and it may help you out for the office...

Try getting a clean (or new) wine bottle and use a vacu-vin to vacuum seal it after each use. Linky

Of course, you'd need a funnel to get the grounds into the wine bottle, but it would be an easy, controlled pour to get them out.

A half-bottle or even beer bottle would work as well.
Imagination is more important than knowledge :)
 
Do yourself a great favor and start drinking good quality tea instead of awful coffee.

Please don't buy Gevalia coffee or anything with chicory. Not to offend anyone, but Gevalia coffee is over-roasted, preground, stale and overpriced for the convenience of regular delivery. They market well and their free drip maker for signing up is a great incentive, but for the same price you pay for Gevalia (or less), try fresh whole beans, burr-ground just before brewing at around 200F in a good drip maker. It's like a great morning shave with perfect lather and a warm brush.

For those of you who really want to enjoy excellent coffee, do check out Sweet Maria's and go to the CoffeeGeek website. Folks there may be a bit passionate, but they're a helpful bunch.


gevalia--a swedish company makes good if a little expensive coffee.join their coffee club and get a different style each month,usually they sweeten the deal with a coffee maker.a friend subscribed for several years, he was happy with the deal. or buy an inexpensive coffee maker and visit the supermarket or wal-mart and wander the coffee aisle.low-caff and half -caff versions are available now.many stores have grinders so you can make your own mix.i love a good hazelnut or french vanilla coffee,but for a standard cup of coffee JFG is hard to beat.JFG is a regional brand available in the southern u.s. states it is a very mild with little bitterness product.also you will see new orleans style coffees with chicory root added,the chicory milds down the coffee.i enjoy it occassionally. happy brewing.
 
-1 - I buy whole bean medium roast coffees from Gevalia and they are always fresh and bursting with aroma and flavor. I grind them with a burr grinder.

I am more than happy with the quality for the price paid and I have tried many other whole bean coffees, but I also continue buying Gevalia.

Tim
 
-1 - I buy whole bean medium roast coffees from Gevalia and they are always fresh and bursting with aroma and flavor. I grind them with a burr grinder.

I am more than happy with the quality for the price paid and I have tried many other whole bean coffees, but I also continue buying Gevalia.

Tim
LOL at the -1 and :thumbdown! You're certainly passionate about and protective of Gevalia. I've had ground Gevalia too many times but whole bean Gevalia only a few times. To each his own. If you like it that's what matters.

If you're interested in trying some small batch roasted whole bean coffee for about the same price as Gevalia, (which either processes large quantities per batch or they may buy from an industrial processor; I don't know) try these. They're small operations that don't spend much on marketing, don't over-roast and ship within a day. If you do try them, post your impressions.

http://www.gimmecoffee.com/

http://www.cuveecoffee.com/coffee.htm

http://metropoliscoffee.com/shop/coffee/

http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/

http://www.doubleff.com/

http://www.coffeeemergency.com/espresso.php

http://www.eccocaffe.com/catalog/index.php

http://www.lacolombe.com/business.html

If you want to buy inexpensive good coffee that's probably equal to or better than Gevalia try:

http://coffeebeandirect.com/

http://www.portorico.com/

Coffee bean direct is about 1/2 the cost of Gevalia even for their organic fair trade whole bean. But you have to buy 5 lbs. at a time minimum.

Porto Rico is available in 1 lb. but they always have a sale going on for a different coffee each week. That knocks a few $ off. Twice a year they have a big sale of 6-10 coffees at a time.
 
I'm in the same boat with the ticker and "leaded" coffee (and only going on 28!). If you have a Ten Thousand Villages store nearby, they have some great coffees, all fair-traded, too. Right now, I'm fond of the Level Ground Trading Ltd.'s Cafe San Miguel Decaf. I've got a bag of Equal Exchange's Decaf Colombian that I'm waiting to break into soon; too many open coffees right now.

Mike
 
LOL at the -1 and :thumbdown! You're certainly passionate about and protective of Gevalia. I've had ground Gevalia too many times but whole bean Gevalia only a few times. To each his own. If you like it that's what matters.

..............
Thanks. I have had many other excellent coffees over the years, but I have also had a subscription to Gevalia for almost 20 years. I have never had anything else so good as to make me want to stop buying Gevalia.

And your point is the same as mine - If you like something, don't worry about what others say, just go ahead and enjoy it.

I happen to strongly dislike Starbucks coffee. To me, it is over-roasted and bitter. But, many, many others seem to love it. Good for them!

But, please note: I recommended Gevalia because I like it and I did not accompany it with attacks of Starbucks or anything else. Then you came in and basically said, "Gevalia is not worthy of your attention, its too expensive and not very good." That is why I came back to the defense of a coffee that I have enjoyed for many years, all along trying other coffees and finding many that I enjoy just as much. But, I live in a relatively small city and it is very convenient to have Gevalia keep me supplied with some of my favorites on a regular basis. If it is a bit expensive, I can live with it.

Thank you, again. Let's be friends. :smile:

Tim
 

rtaylor61

Moderator Emeritus
Gents,

What you like in coffee will differ just as what you like on your steak. BTW...steak sauce should be outlawed! This is all personal opinion and preference, so lets discuss things and agree to disagree at times. We are all friends here. We have to be. Too many sharp objects laying around not to be!

Randy
 
I never really got into coffee, but recently I've been inspired by many of the reviews and writings of the members here and I think it's time to me to try some good coffee and see how that goes over. The only coffee I've ever enjoyed was Kona.

First off, like I said I never got into coffee. I've never bought a cofee maker as there was no need. So what products do you guys recommend to get started?

Hi there Tim,
I'm sure you realize that 'good' coffee means different things, depending on who you ask. So many choices, variables such as origins and roast and grind types, all playing their parts in making 'good' coffee a very personal preference. I can tell you what varieties I may enjoy and why, but instead I'll try to answer your question about products. Let me, if I may, offer up a few tips for getting started. I started drinking coffee when I was five, and I AM particular about it. Being an old geezer now has given me some history to draw on as a guide for the advice. Of course, YMMV.
First of all, I'm assuming you do actually LIKE the taste of coffee, since you mentioned Kona as working for you. You like the taste of coffee ice cream also? How about coffee candy? I'm guessing the answer's "yes", although you rarely if ever buy those things. You like the idea of the coffee you're drinking tasting like those things in some way? The flavor appeals to you, right? Bear with me a sec...heh. I ask this because I've been 'inspired' numerous times to try getting into tea, and I just can't. Scotch either. It's not that I don't WANT to like those things, believe me. But they're just not for me at this time, or ever have been. I'm just saying you may not ever find coffee to be your cup of tea.
Tim, I noticed that no one posted much about what they may or may not ADD to their drink. I'm sure there's lots here that drink it black. Others may add a bit of sugar or cream. Some may use both. You need to determine which of those ways is 'you'...hehe. I love coffee, but HATE drinking it black. I stopped using sugar in it many years ago, but I still use cream. Here's a well known 'secret' you're probably aware of: adding milk or cream 'opens up' that coffee flavor. I'm not alone in stating that there's something wonderful about the way adding a dairy product to coffee unlocks something. Taking that one step further, there's some restaurants that offer WHIPPING cream (unwhipped of course) as an alternative to regular cream. THAT is tasty!
Try that sometime with whatever coffee you're sampling. A little bit of that won't clog your arteries up too badly. It seems like the higher the butterfat, the 'richer' the coffee flavor tastes, IMHO. Maybe it's like what happens when just a little water is added to a good scotch? Opens it up somehow, from what I've read about it.
I can recommend a few inexpensive, yet very effective coffee makers. First would be an old fashioned drip Melitta maker. You have a plastic (or glass or wood) cone filled with grounds ( and an either bleached or unbleached filter) sitting on top of a glass or plastic coffee pot. Very hot water is poured over the coffee and drips through to the pot. Easy huh? Just remember NOT to get the water boiling. You'll get a nice cup of coffee with those, and they're quite inexpensive as well (under 20 bucks).
Next to try would be a french press. Before continuing, let me mention something about this product, and how to try one before buying. In my area (near Chicago), some Starbuck stores will make up a french press batch for you if you ASK. It may not be on the menu, but if you're willing to wait a few minutes they may do it.....no extra charge either. It could be that each store has their own policy, but it can't hurt to ask. It's a style that adds a different taste, (to me at least) and I'll leave it at that. Well worth trying.
So, getting back to the press:
Its a round and tall glass or plastic vessel..... sort of a cylindrical looking pot that has a plunger attached by a long thin rod to a round filter that runs the hot water through the grounds and hot water. You push the filter through the suspension, and it comes out coffee!!!. Takes just a few minutes.......easy again. These are also available for 20 bucks or less. It's a favorite with lots of people.
So, rather than tell you about my personal favorite blends, I hope my take on a few helpful tools to get started will help in some way. Heh, a quest for your very own 'good' cup of coffee......might take a little while.
Good luck with your new, maybe soon to be .......hobby?
Martin

Oh, btw: If I'm not mistaken, each of those types of coffeemakers require a different type of coffee grind setting for maximum enjoyment. Hehe.........see how it starts?
 
-1 - I buy whole bean medium roast coffees from Gevalia and they are always fresh and bursting with aroma and flavor. I grind them with a burr grinder.
I am more than happy with the quality for the price paid and I have tried many other whole bean coffees, but I also continue buying Gevalia.
Tim
Gevalia (Kraft Foods) is a huge coffee producer, produces 40,000 metric tons of coffee every year. In Europe it's sold as just another supermarket brand. Seriously, find some FRESH roasted beans locally (not more than 10 days post roast) and use them for a couple of weeks then try to go back to Gevalia.

PM me. I'll send you a half pound of freshly roasted beans.:001_tt1:

john
 
JPK,

Very nice gesture! Freshly roasted beans can bring coffee Nirvana. They're hard to come by unless you roast your own, are near a roaster, or find a reputable small batch purveyor that ships within a day or two of roasting.

The two discount roasters I listed claim to ship immediately after roasting, but I'm not so sure. Their coffee is good but isn't of the same caliber as the verified fresh roasted I've had.
 
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