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Beer of the Day - BOTD - 2021

Research shows I’m wrong. 8 and 10 are both quads, and 8 is a lower gravity version of 10. 6 is a dubbel.
 
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...I think...

Wikipedia says it refers to their gravities, rising from 6 to 10. Wikipedia also says that 10 is a barleywine. Hopefully someone with more knowledge chimes in. I just know that I enjoy the higher numbers more. They seem richer and more flavorful.
 

Whisky

Contributor
I need to go back to kindergarten or get my eyes checked. I swear the bottles were labeled 1-10 but it looks like 6,8, and 10 are the only ones produced. I’ll have to try them out next time I’m there.
 

TexLaw

Fussy Evil Genius
Contributor
...I think...

Wikipedia says it refers to their gravities, rising from 6 to 10. Wikipedia also says that 10 is a barleywine. Hopefully someone with more knowledge chimes in. I just know that I enjoy the higher numbers more. They seem richer and more flavorful.
I don't know that I'd call any abbey style or other classic Belgian beer a "barleywine." That's a term typically applied to certain British or American beers. Although Rochfort 8 and 10 certainly have many qualities in common with a big, English barleywine, it's far more appropriate to refer to them as quadrupels or quads (and, before that term came about, as "grand cru").

The numbers refer to the original gravity of the beers. The 6 means that the OG is approximately 1.060, the 8 signifies an OG approximately 1.080, and so on.
 
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