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Badger knot info

Hello! I've recently knotted two badger knots (TGN silver tip 26mm and maggards 2 band 26mm) and love them! They're my first badgers after being a synthetic person.

My questions: any upkeep advice? Do's and don'ts?


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RenoRichard

Contributor
Nice job on the re-knots! Badger brushes really don't require much maintenance. Just rinse thoroughly and allow to air dry. When we stay in New York City with a tiny, steamy bathroom, I take the brush out of the bathroom and let it dry elsewhere. Otherwise, you should be good to go.
 

emwolf

Contributor
I'm a big fan of the badger. I always give at least 2 days between uses of a badger, thoroughly rinse it after use and gently shake out extra moisture. I usually travel with a synthetic since they dry quickly and are usually priced considerably lower. I've heard of using shampoo and other things, but I've never used anything other than shaving soap/cream and water to clean my brushes.
 
I've always just rinsed good with hot water and shake excess water out then brush a little bit on a towel to dry fairly well then hang the brush knot down to dry. I've heard running them under cold water occasionally once in a while then drying is supposed to be good for them. Something to do with Badgers being cold weather animals. Not sure how much affect it really has.
 
I don't use any hot water with my brushes at all. I may use warm sometimes especially when rinsing them. But I believe that hot water will cause expansion and contraction and I don't want any of the glue involved in the brush to be negatively affected. I believe that's why many guys suffer from shedding brushes.

I also don't use conditioner on mine or a shampoo or other product that has conditioner in it. Badger hair is supposed to absorb a little bit of water to work properly and conditioner definitely gets in the way of that. and there are a couple of folks who had a really good thread going in another shaving community , with some good scientific info about that, but I believe the exclusive rules of this one prevent me from posting it here. Dm me if you'd like me to send you the link.

I have hard water and eventually I will need to use some type of product to clean those deposits off of my brushes. I'll probably start to address that at about 100 or 150 uses. a soak in a vinegar solution should take care of that easily.

I once had a soap maker tell me that you don't have to buy any of these shaving brush cleaning soaps if you don't want to. He said that the chemistry in Williams mug soap will pretty much remove any oils and stuff from your brush just like the more expensive ones do. if you use a pre-shave product that has high oil or butter type content, you may need to clean your brushes more often.

Those are two really good knots that you have there! I know you'll enjoy those for a long time to come.

(Sent from mobile)
 
I don't use any hot water with my brushes at all. I may use warm sometimes especially when rinsing them. But I believe that hot water will cause expansion and contraction and I don't want any of the glue involved in the brush to be negatively affected. I believe that's why many guys suffer from shedding brushes.

I also don't use conditioner on mine or a shampoo or other product that has conditioner in it. Badger hair is supposed to absorb a little bit of water to work properly and conditioner definitely gets in the way of that. and there are a couple of folks who had a really good thread going in another shaving community , with some good scientific info about that, but I believe the exclusive rules of this one prevent me from posting it here. Dm me if you'd like me to send you the link.

I have hard water and eventually I will need to use some type of product to clean those deposits off of my brushes. I'll probably start to address that at about 100 or 150 uses. a soak in a vinegar solution should take care of that easily.

I once had a soap maker tell me that you don't have to buy any of these shaving brush cleaning soaps if you don't want to. He said that the chemistry in Williams mug soap will pretty much remove any oils and stuff from your brush just like the more expensive ones do. if you use a pre-shave product that has high oil or butter type content, you may need to clean your brushes more often.

Those are two really good knots that you have there! I know you'll enjoy those for a long time to come.

(Sent from mobile)
Thank you for the info! I really appreciate it

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