What's new
  • Welcome back Guest!
    If you have been away from our site you may have to request a new password. Simply click on the link for "lost" password in the log in page.
    Thank you.
  • Guest
    The BST is now open, please note the changes in our guidelines to address the recent fraudulent activity. Ensure you read the guidelines prior to creating a sale thread in the Buy-Sell-Trade forum with special attention to the new photo and payment requirements.
    Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Are tea bags making us plastic?

A lot of the new infusers are the same thing. Especially the ones that come as a set with cups. Fine plastic mesh. I own one myself that I shouldn't be using and will probably stop after this discussion.
 

luvmysuper

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
I'm personally not going to waste a moment of my time worrying about it.
Everything kills you, everything is dangerous, everything causes cancer. You can't even break wind in California without an environmental emissions certificate.
We seriously have become a society that is afraid of its own shadow.
 
Meh, it's easy enough to switch to loose leaf tea only. Probably not gaining anything from using a plastic tea bag. Thanks for the article.
 

the_edski

Moderator Emeritus
Not to hijack the thread, but I completely agree

I'm personally not going to waste a moment of my time worrying about it.
Everything kills you, everything is dangerous, everything causes cancer. You can't even break wind in California without an environmental emissions certificate.
We seriously have become a society that is afraid of its own shadow.
 
No no, not at all. My apologies if I implied there was.
I just am beginning to feel like we seem to be afraid of everything.
No need to apologize. :)

I think part of the reason that it seems like we are afraid of everything, is that there is more these days with which to be concerned. Companies will pump harmful chemicals into consumables to save a buck, etc, etc... I feel like we are in an age of discovering just how many harmful things are fed to us.
 

luvmysuper

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
The internet and modern communications with the ability to get information on demand has served as both a boon and a bane in our lives.
To a certain extent, we are a whole lot more educated as consumers in as far as what may be potentially harmful to us. In some ways, it's a curse because what in many cases is considered by scientists as a very small risk level is blown far out of proportion by commercial fear mongers who are interested in selling us alternatives to what the "evil corporations" provide.
The "all natural" craze is a multi-billion dollar industry, and I have come to trust those folks no more than I do the greedy companies that place their own interests before the consumer.
Every company or group is trying to promote their own product over the competition, and I personally believe that legitimate companies who would poison their customer base are very rare. It's simply not worth it.
It then comes down to a matter of personal choice.
 
It's an interesting perspective, and I have known people, personally, who get very caught up in fad fears. I think there is still room for good sense and trying to make healthy decisions. I understand what you are saying, though, and I agree that it can be frustrating.
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
I've been so concerned with this that I've taken to eschewing all manner of preparation vessels. Now I simply hold a pile of loose leaves in my hand and pour boiling water over it. Makes for easy clean up, too.

The only downside is the rather nasty looking burns, which slightly alters the taste of the tea. I was referred to a doctor for skin grafts, but I had to turn away when I saw this sign at his office.

$neon-plastic-surgery-sign.jpg

What do I do now?
 
Too funny!!!

I've been so concerned with this that I've taken to eschewing all manner of preparation vessels. Now I simply hold a pile of loose leaves in my hand and pour boiling water over it. Makes for easy clean up, too.

The only downside is the rather nasty looking burns, which slightly alters the taste of the tea. I was referred to a doctor for skin grafts, but I had to turn away when I saw this sign at his office.

View attachment 325350

What do I do now?
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
Moderator Emeritus
I hear that Mayor Bloomberg is going to outlaw tea bags. Don't tell Ouch.

:tongue_sm



Look, we as a society get worked up about lots of stuff. Back when all the cars were driving on leaded gasoline, teabag plasticity probably wasn't our Number One public health concern. Heck, two hundred years ago, "throw it in the nearest open ditch" was the standard plan for sewage disposal in every major city in the western world.

So, we got the Bubonic Plague and smallpox under control, so then we had to move on to cholera. Done. Okay, now I guess polio is the biggest target left. Done. And on we go ... cigarettes ... lead ... asbestos ...

... once all the "biggies" are dealt with or at least under control, we can't just ... stop ... we have to keep looking for what else we can do to make our lives healthier and happier.


Never stop learning and improving. (And yes, sometimes that means admitting when we were wrong in the past when we thought we were making improvements.)

What do I do now?
Let me introduce you to a friend of mine. He works for the Chinese secret service, and he's also an expert in tea. He's that chap over there in the tuxedo.

"Hello, my name is Wan. Gai Wan."
 

Alacrity59

Wanting for wisdom
Moderator Emeritus
Hang in . . . as a Mod of this forum I think this may be drifting off topic.

Can't remember what the topic is . . . .


Yes I'd be ok with metal and also natural material tea infusers. Heck I think mostly where I have tea they just chuck it in the pot and it settles down to the bottom . . . mostly.
 
Well I like my plastic tea infuser, it works pretty good, and I would think that living in a fairly industrial city, eating food that is far from good for me, and all the other stuff, it won't affect me much. Though I am in the market for a nice tea pot...
 
Hang in . . . as a Mod of this forum I think this may be drifting off topic.

Can't remember what the topic is . . . .


Yes I'd be ok with metal and also natural material tea infusers. Heck I think mostly where I have tea they just chuck it in the pot and it settles down to the bottom . . . mostly.
Hmm. I would reply but staring at this monitor that I guess gives me cancer, while typing on this keyboard that had lead in it just caused me to die......well at least if I was in California
 
These environmental concerns are hard for the lay person to sort out. Plastic is derived from petroleum which is derived from plants (green = good) or dinosaurs ;-), but the biological reaction with the human body is ??. I try not to get too worked up about them, but moderation is probably good advice.

I know the comment about lead was said in passing, but there was an interesting interview on the radio yesterday: Criminologist Believes Violent Behavior Is Biological, where the author presented a couple pieces of evidence to try and explain how the reduction of lead in the environment (i.e. no more leaded gasoline or lead paint) has been correlated to a reduction in violent crime over the past few decades. And he didn't give these criminal minds a free pass because of biology.
 
Tea in bags = Cart Razors. Loose-leaf = DE Razors. DE razors require more skill like brewing a good cup of tea, yet they are totally worth the benefits if you can put in the effort. Tea in bags work when you either don't care or are in too much of a hurry.

Tea that comes in a bag is second-rate. Sure, I've seen low-quality loose leaf tea. However, if it's in a bag, you can be assured it's only 2nd rate. I order lots of tea off of the 'bay direct from china, and have been content with the quality of the tea. Nothing compares to it. But I admit: bagged tea is great when you're in a hurry and throw a bag into the thermos with the boiling water.

These silky bags do nothing to enhance the quality of the tea other than add to the cost. Order samples, find the tea(s) you like, and then buy in bulk from a seller with a good reputation/rating.
 
You guys are going to start a hoarding of stainless steel infusers which will surely lead to an acute and potentially chronic shortage. Couple that with the fact that government agencies are purchasing stainless infusers at an alarming rate (nearly three times the amount they will use for brewing in a given year) and many of us will be unable to brew at all. What good is exercising our 99th amendment right to purchase and own teapots if we are unable to acquire infusers to use them? Conspiracy?

Support the NSA! The National Steeping Organization is actively engaged in promoting safe brewing education and support for our 99th amendment rights. Join now.
 

Alacrity59

Wanting for wisdom
Moderator Emeritus
Crixus,

I personally find this hilarious and thank you for it. I'm sure that both you and I are aware of how seriously folk take the second amendment. Please people, let's not get into political debate on the second amendment. The issue is health concerns over consumption of tea brewed in plastic tea bags.




You guys are going to start a hoarding of stainless steel infusers which will surely lead to an acute and potentially chronic shortage. Couple that with the fact that government agencies are purchasing stainless infusers at an alarming rate (nearly three times the amount they will use for brewing in a given year) and many of us will be unable to brew at all. What good is exercising our 99th amendment right to purchase and own teapots if we are unable to acquire infusers to use them? Conspiracy?

Support the NSA! The National Steeping Organization is actively engaged in promoting safe brewing education and support for our 99th amendment rights. Join now.
 
Top Bottom