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Are progressive lenses worth it?

My eye sight has changed and I need prescription glasses. I would like to know if I should get lined bifocals or progressive lenses?
 
My eye sight has changed and I need prescription glasses. I would like to know if I should get lined bifocals or progressive lenses?
I’ve been wearing progressive lenses for years now. I required no adjustment. I just put them on and was good to go. You’ll learn quickly ever to position your head/eyes to learn what part of the lens to look through. On the other hand my wife had to adjust to them whilst going down steps. The lenses are costly though. I never wore conventional bifocals so cant help you there.
good luck
 

emwolf

Contributor
I have two pairs of glasses, progressive for dress occasions and traditional bifocals for work and play. I find the progressive lenses easier to find the proper angle, but bifocals are easier switching from close to distance and back again.
 
I've only used progressives. Had next to no adjustment issues, but started out when glasses were bigger. Now it's the only ones I use.

I witnessed the day my old boss went to bifocals. It was on a house construction site, and he immediately had problems driving nails. He said he saw two (top and bottom) of every nail he tried to drive. He was so convinced something was wrong that he went back to the optometrist that afternoon. It turned out he just hadn't adapted to them.
 
I also wear glasses and need them for both distance and reading and in between. I actually tried the ones with the line and I noticed the line all the time. Could not get used to them. Switched to progressives, actually trifocals, and after figuring out how to adjust my line of sight depending on what I am looking at, I now am totally used to them and couldn't think of going back to the lined trifocals. My wife is an optometrist and while we don't always agree on lots of things, I totally agree that progressives are the way to go.
 
I've never had lined bifocals. Never needed glasses at all until I was in my early 40's and I was able to get by with readers for a few years after that. Finally got some progressives about 6 months ago. They took a little getting used to. I walked right off a curb without seeing it and fell on my face the first day I had them so be careful at first. But once you get used to them, they definitely make life a little easier.
 
I've never had lined bifocals. Never needed glasses at all until I was in my early 40's and I was able to get by with readers for a few years after that. Finally got some progressives about 6 months ago. They took a little getting used to. I walked right off a curb without seeing it and fell on my face the first day I had them so be careful at first. But once you get used to them, they definitely make life a little easier.
This was my experience almost exactly, except it wasn't six months ago, it was fifteen years ago. It took me a week or so to get used to them enough that I felt comfortable driving with them and didn't have to be deliberate about going down stairs. Other than that short break-in period, they've been fine.
 
I opted for the progressive lenses many years ago. Never been sorry. Can't be bothered carrying 2 pair of glasses and switching back & forth.
 
Another vote for progressives. I went with my local eyeglasses place for my first prescription, both to get my interpupillary distance and also to get them custom fitted. For my next set, I plan on trying mail order to see if they work the same, as online glasses are a lot cheaper.
 
My first pair of glasses were progressives but I nearly always wear single vision glasses and switch between glasses depending on the task....or more often than not do not wear any glasses.

About the progressives, I found that the gradual change in focus to be distracting and required too much head rotation instead of eye rotation. The sensation I had was that the glasses improved vision clarity in maybe 1/3 of the field of view, made it worse in 1/3, and was different but neither worse or better in the remaining 1/3. So it was mostly better not to wear the glasses even though they made part of the world much clearer. I have been tempted to buy some bifocals so that I got a choice about which part of the glass to use but I have not done that yet.
 
I've been wearing spectacles since I was 6 years old, and I'm 50 now. I have severe myopia and astigmatism. Now I also need near correction for reading. I got high index progressive lenses 6 months ago. It only took me two days to adjust to them. Now I have no problems driving, using the computer or reading books/ text on my mobile in the smallest font. I'm glad I chose progressive lenses rather than lined bifocals.

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In my 70's. Despite eye docs telling me for 20 years that when my eyes get bad enough, they'll adjust to bifocal or progressive, I was never able to adjust. Tried and hated both. My last eye exam was 2 years ago and she suggested 3 pair (1 for reading, 1 for pc and one for distance). I never filled that prescription. I wear scratched up reading glasses from 12 years ago for pc work, reading glasses from 8 years ago for reading and none for distance. Reading especially sucks, so it's almost time to give in and finally get some decent glasses. Driving isn't a problem yet, but new pc and reading glasses would help.
 
In my 70's. Despite eye docs telling me for 20 years that when my eyes get bad enough, they'll adjust to bifocal or progressive, I was never able to adjust. Tried and hated both. My last eye exam was 2 years ago and she suggested 3 pair (1 for reading, 1 for pc and one for distance). I never filled that prescription. I wear scratched up reading glasses from 12 years ago for pc work, reading glasses from 8 years ago for reading and none for distance. Reading especially sucks, so it's almost time to give in and finally get some decent glasses. Driving isn't a problem yet, but new pc and reading glasses would help.
You would be well advised to follow the recommendations of your eye doctor. If you are using old prescriptions in those glasses as you say, and your eyes have likely changed prescription since then, possibly drastically, by using the old glasses you are causing your eyes to strain which can have a negative effect on your eyesight in general.
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
Not a close question for me. For me progressives are the way to go. I recall a very minor adjustment to them.

Re reading glasses, unless you have a big difference between the eyes, or maybe astigmatism, I think over the counter glasses are going to be basically as good as having them made to meet a prescription.

For that matter, I have progressive lenses, but often take my glasses off altogether to read. I sure need glasses for driving/distance!
 
I started with progressive lenses back when the best they could do was "blended bifocals". They were horrible. I could not wear them more than 15 minutes before becoming nauseous. However, that was about 30 years ago. The computer aided grinding equipment they use today does a great job. However, they do so at a cost.
If you can afford to purchase progressives, do so. However, if you are needing bi-focals for the first time, simple bifocals may be perfectly adequate and a lot less expensive.

A year ago I had cataracts removed with fixed focus lens implants. Thus, without progressive lenses, I would only be able to focus at one distance. The progressives give me a range of focal distances, although to read fine print, I still have to use powerful (+3.0) reading glasses.
 
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