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are high end talcs worth it?

the big container of JnJ Baby Powder is just about empty and I am thinking about what's next. What are your recommendations and your reasons too. :) TIA
 

ajkel64

Moderator
I only buy the biggest and cheapest Talc (Homebrand here in Australia) as I use them mainly for chafing. I don’t apply it like you do with a baby. I remember using it as a teenager but that was mainly using Talc’s out of gift packs from Grandparents. What do you use your Talc for?
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
I like Snakehead brand talc. I assume Chinese manufacture. It seemed to be everywhere in Thailand. Very reasonably priced. Loaded with menthol. I do worry about asbestos, though. I like the Italian talcs, too.
 
I use Pinaud Clubman Finest Powder. Just read the description of their Whiskey Woods version and it sounds interesting. I might try that one when my current supply runs out.

Tim
 
Some talc contains asbestos. I would think you'd definitely want to avoid that.
Actually all true talcum products contain trace amounts of asbestos. The asbestos is a trace mineral contaminant in talcum veins. Both are extracted by mining the talcum vein and virtually impossible to completely separate during processing and refinement.

Tim
 
Actually all true talcum products contain trace amounts of asbestos. The asbestos is a trace mineral contaminant in talcum veins. Both are extracted by mining the talcum vein and virtually impossible to completely separate during processing and refinement.

Tim
Correct!... and take it from a Geologist and certified Asbestos inspector, you do NOT want to be putting this on your body and, as a consequence, breathing and/or ingesting the unseen airborne tremolite or anthophyllite crystal fibers! There are PLENTY if suitable body powders out there besides talcum.
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
Correct!... and take it from a Geologist and certified Asbestos inspector, you do NOT want to be putting this on your body and, as a consequence, breathing and/or ingesting the unseen airborne tremolite or anthophyllite crystal fibers! There are PLENTY if suitable body powders out there besides talcum.
Asbestos is bad?

Next thing, they’ll be talking the lead out of our gasoline.
 
Not wanting to hijack the thread, I smoked a pack a day of Kent with “famous micronite filter“ for about a year when I was a teenager. Turned out that the micronite filter contained asbestos. Other than Johnson’s BP when I was very young, I don’t use powder.

Curious though what the non-talc options are? Not silica, maybe powdered chalk? Talc does have a nice silky flow and doesn’t Ren’s to clump.
 
Not wanting to hijack the thread, I smoked a pack a day of Kent with “famous micronite filter“ for about a year when I was a teenager. Turned out that the micronite filter contained asbestos. Other than Johnson’s BP when I was very young, I don’t use powder.

Curious though what the non-talc options are? Not silica, maybe powdered chalk? Talc does have a nice silky flow and doesn’t Ren’s to clump.
Most are mixtures of a starch with a fragrance and maybe some baking soda.
  • Cornstarch powder
  • Arrowroot powder
  • Kaolin clay
  • Moroccan Rhassoul clay
  • Baking soda
  • Cocoa powder
  • Essential oil or fragrance oil
 
No. They are NOT worth it. Not in the least. I would get your standard Johnson & Johnsons but the scented kind, like Lavender. I would guess that it outperforms high end stuff. High end products such as the talc and deodorant of a major fragrance are often cheaper in quality than we would like to believe.
 
My post was in answer to somebody's question about what ingredients are used in body powder nowadays. Most body powders don't contain kaolin.

Prolonged exposure such as occupational contact with any type of dust is best avoided, whether that be kaolin, construction dust, wood dust, grain dust, flour, etc. Check with OSHA, I'm sure they have regulations about it.
 
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