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Anniversary Contest - TEN years!

In the spring of 2008, I was at the zoo with my then-girlfriend and they had a scale you could step on that showed you how much you weighed in terms of chickens, goats, and cow. I stepped on the scale and weighed 4 goats (equivalent to 240 lbs) and immediately balked at that, verbally assuming that the scale must be broken (even at 6'3", I had never previously weighed anywhere near that). Said girlfriend stepped on the scale and said it was accurate. I wept. When did I get so big? Turns out the combination of entering my mid-20s and getting an office job, along with my already sedentary lifestyle of video games, movies, and poor eating habits was a recipe for corpulence. I was unhappy with myself and made some slight changes, like cutting out soda and trying to cook at home more, but made no drastic alterations to my lifestyle. Fast-forward to that December and my dad, who was also quite heavy, had a heart attack. Not long after, the girlfriend and I broke up. Nothing wills one to exercise like being single and watching a close relative in the hospital.

Since my dad had now graduated from "should probably lose weight" to "you're going to die if you do not lose weight" and I was looking to shed some pounds, I told him I would make the drive to go the gym with him, to help keep both of us accountable (It should be noted that prior to this I had never exercised more than a few days in a row). It was tough in the beginning. I would walk for about half an hour on a treadmill, as when I attempted a light jog I was winded in less than five minutes. I eventually got down to 215, which was certainly an improvement, but my goal was 200 lbs, with a stretch goal of 180. I did not actually believe I would ever hit the 180 mark, but I kept it in my back pocket in case pigs started to fly. Eventually I started to do some heavier cardio work and began to lift weights after I was laid off from work and had a lot more time on my hands (I cannot stress enough how out of my wheelhouse this was for me at the time). I got down to 205, but after starting a new job eventually crept back up to 215. I had been so close to 200 but had not quite made it. Now I was sure 180 was an impossibility, but I still wanted to crack 200.

I buckled down. I went to the gym more, never missing a day (for the previous year I was prone to skip here and there, anytime my dad was unable to make it). I got into a great routine. I was starting to do high intensity intervals. I cooked all of my meals at home, counting calories. On days my dad couldn't make it, I still went, even though I did not have anyone to be accountable to aside from myself. I got closer and closer and eventually hit 200. This only spurned me on even more. I still remember the joy (and shock) of stepping onto the scale and seeing it sitting at 200. It was the best motivation to exercise I had ever had. I worked even harder, now visiting the gym more often, even weekends. It started to melt off. 197, 195, 190. Suddenly, 180 was not only not impossible, but it was attainable. I was running faster, lifting more. I could now do more than four push-ups in a setting. I could finally do a pull-up (a few actually). Eventually it happened; I hit the impossible 180 lb. mark. I couldn't believe it. I lost an entire goat! I had to buy smaller clothes. I was able to do several pull-ups. I was doing 140 push-ups a day. I was running 5 and 10ks; for fun! I say all this not to brag, because these aren't impressive numbers, relatively speaking, but for me it was a big deal. I hit the 10-mark anniversary of that journey early last year and sometimes it's still hard to imagine I've been working out for an entire decade, something I never thought would happen, when I think about who I used to be. Here's to another 10 years of health, fitness, and keeping the weight off.

Epilogue: I went back to the zoo after losing the weight and stepped on that scale again. 3 goats.
 
Last edited:

shavefan

I’m not a fan
LOL

LOL! That's what happens when you don't read the entire thread! I am touched though, that at least two people on this planet care if and when my lovely War Department stops beating me!

I admit I was too lazy to read through 70 some odd posts. Glad it was nothing more serious than a (probably well deserved) beating from the wife. Please give her my best and I wish you a speedy recovery my friend.

Oh, and congrats @Captain Pre-Capsize !
 
In the spring of 2008, I was at the zoo with my then-girlfriend and they had a scale you could step on that showed you how much you weighed in terms of chickens, goats, and cow. I stepped on the scale and weighed 4 goats (equivalent to 240 lbs) and immediately balked at that, verbally assuming that the scale must be broken (even at 6'3", I had never previously weighed anywhere near that). Said girlfriend stepped on the scale and said it was accurate. I wept. When did I get so big? Turns out the combination of entering my mid-20s and getting an office job, along with my already sedentary lifestyle of video games, movies, and poor eating habits was a recipe for corpulence. I was unhappy with myself and made some slight changes, like cutting out soda and trying to cook at home more, but made no drastic alterations to my lifestyle. Fast-forward to that December and my dad, who was also quite heavy, had a heart attack. Not long after, the girlfriend and I broke up. Nothing wills one to exercise like being single and watching a close relative in the hospital.

Since my dad had now graduated from "should probably lose weight" to "you're going to die if you do not lose weight" and I was looking to shed some pounds, I told him I would make the drive to go the gym with him, to help keep both of us accountable (It should be noted that prior to this I had never exercised more than a few days in a row). It was tough in the beginning. I would walk for about half an hour on a treadmill, as when I attempted a light jog I was winded in less than five minutes. I eventually got down to 215, which was certainly an improvement, but my goal was 200 lbs, with a stretch goal of 180. I did not actually believe I would ever hit the 180 mark, but I kept it in my back pocket in case pigs started to fly. Eventually I started to do some heavier cardio work and began to lift weights after I was laid off from work and had a lot more time on my hands (I cannot stress enough how out of my wheelhouse this was for me at the time). I got down to 205, but after starting a new job eventually crept back up to 215. I had been so close to 200 but had not quite made it. Now I was sure 180 was an impossibility, but I still wanted to crack 200.

I buckled down. I went to the gym more, never missing a day (for the previous year I was prone to skip here and there, anytime my dad was unable to make it). I got into a great routine. I was starting to do high intensity intervals. I cooked all of my meals at home, counting calories. On days my dad couldn't make it, I still went, even though I did not have anyone to be accountable to aside from myself. I got closer and closer and eventually hit 200. This only spurned me on even more. I still remember the joy (and shock) of stepping onto the scale and seeing it sitting at 200. It was the best motivation to exercise I had ever had. I worked even harder, now visiting the gym more often, even weekends. It started to melt off. 197, 195, 190. Suddenly, 180 was not only not impossible, but it was attainable. I was running faster, lifting more. I could now do more than four push-ups in a setting. I could finally do a pull-up (a few actually). Eventually it happened; I hit the impossible 180 lb. mark. I couldn't believe it. I lost an entire goat! I had to buy smaller clothes. I was able to do several pull-ups. I was doing 140 push-ups a day. I was running 5 and 10ks; for fun! I say all this not to brag, because these aren't impressive numbers, relatively speaking, but for me it was a big deal. I hit the 10-mark anniversary of that journey early last year and sometimes it's still hard to imagine I've been working out for an entire decade, something I never thought would happen, when I think about who I used to be. Here's to another 10 years of health, fitness, and keeping the weight off.

Epilogue: I went back to the zoo after losing the weight and stepped on that scale again. 3 goats.
Awesome! You've already won!
 
In the spring of 2008, I was at the zoo with my then-girlfriend and they had a scale you could step on that showed you how much you weighed in terms of chickens, goats, and cow. I stepped on the scale and weighed 4 goats (equivalent to 240 lbs) and immediately balked at that, verbally assuming that the scale must be broken (even at 6'3", I had never previously weighed anywhere near that). Said girlfriend stepped on the scale and said it was accurate. I wept. When did I get so big? Turns out the combination of entering my mid-20s and getting an office job, along with my already sedentary lifestyle of video games, movies, and poor eating habits was a recipe for corpulence. I was unhappy with myself and made some slight changes, like cutting out soda and trying to cook at home more, but made no drastic alterations to my lifestyle. Fast-forward to that December and my dad, who was also quite heavy, had a heart attack. Not long after, the girlfriend and I broke up. Nothing wills one to exercise like being single and watching a close relative in the hospital.

Since my dad had now graduated from "should probably lose weight" to "you're going to die if you do not lose weight" and I was looking to shed some pounds, I told him I would make the drive to go the gym with him, to help keep both of us accountable (It should be noted that prior to this I had never exercised more than a few days in a row). It was tough in the beginning. I would walk for about half an hour on a treadmill, as when I attempted a light jog I was winded in less than five minutes. I eventually got down to 215, which was certainly an improvement, but my goal was 200 lbs, with a stretch goal of 180. I did not actually believe I would ever hit the 180 mark, but I kept it in my back pocket in case pigs started to fly. Eventually I started to do some heavier cardio work and began to lift weights after I was laid off from work and had a lot more time on my hands (I cannot stress enough how out of my wheelhouse this was for me at the time). I got down to 205, but after starting a new job eventually crept back up to 215. I had been so close to 200 but had not quite made it. Now I was sure 180 was an impossibility, but I still wanted to crack 200.

I buckled down. I went to the gym more, never missing a day (for the previous year I was prone to skip here and there, anytime my dad was unable to make it). I got into a great routine. I was starting to do high intensity intervals. I cooked all of my meals at home, counting calories. On days my dad couldn't make it, I still went, even though I did not have anyone to be accountable to aside from myself. I got closer and closer and eventually hit 200. This only spurned me on even more. I still remember the joy (and shock) of stepping onto the scale and seeing it sitting at 200. It was the best motivation to exercise I had ever had. I worked even harder, now visiting the gym more often, even weekends. It started to melt off. 197, 195, 190. Suddenly, 180 was not only not impossible, but it was attainable. I was running faster, lifting more. I could now do more than four push-ups in a setting. I could finally do a pull-up (a few actually). Eventually it happened; I hit the impossible 180 lb. mark. I couldn't believe it. I lost an entire goat! I had to buy smaller clothes. I was able to do several pull-ups. I was doing 140 push-ups a day. I was running 5 and 10ks; for fun! I say all this not to brag, because these aren't impressive numbers, relatively speaking, but for me it was a big deal. I hit the 10-mark anniversary of that journey early last year and sometimes it's still hard to imagine I've been working out for an entire decade, something I never thought would happen, when I think about who I used to be. Here's to another 10 years of health, fitness, and keeping the weight off.

Epilogue: I went back to the zoo after losing the weight and stepped on that scale again. 3 goats.
I gotta say Congrats.... I have never congratulated someone for losing a goat before! 🤪
 
In the spring of 2008, I was at the zoo with my then-girlfriend and they had a scale you could step on that showed you how much you weighed in terms of chickens, goats, and cow. I stepped on the scale and weighed 4 goats (equivalent to 240 lbs) and immediately balked at that, verbally assuming that the scale must be broken (even at 6'3", I had never previously weighed anywhere near that). Said girlfriend stepped on the scale and said it was accurate. I wept. When did I get so big? Turns out the combination of entering my mid-20s and getting an office job, along with my already sedentary lifestyle of video games, movies, and poor eating habits was a recipe for corpulence. I was unhappy with myself and made some slight changes, like cutting out soda and trying to cook at home more, but made no drastic alterations to my lifestyle. Fast-forward to that December and my dad, who was also quite heavy, had a heart attack. Not long after, the girlfriend and I broke up. Nothing wills one to exercise like being single and watching a close relative in the hospital.

Since my dad had now graduated from "should probably lose weight" to "you're going to die if you do not lose weight" and I was looking to shed some pounds, I told him I would make the drive to go the gym with him, to help keep both of us accountable (It should be noted that prior to this I had never exercised more than a few days in a row). It was tough in the beginning. I would walk for about half an hour on a treadmill, as when I attempted a light jog I was winded in less than five minutes. I eventually got down to 215, which was certainly an improvement, but my goal was 200 lbs, with a stretch goal of 180. I did not actually believe I would ever hit the 180 mark, but I kept it in my back pocket in case pigs started to fly. Eventually I started to do some heavier cardio work and began to lift weights after I was laid off from work and had a lot more time on my hands (I cannot stress enough how out of my wheelhouse this was for me at the time). I got down to 205, but after starting a new job eventually crept back up to 215. I had been so close to 200 but had not quite made it. Now I was sure 180 was an impossibility, but I still wanted to crack 200.

I buckled down. I went to the gym more, never missing a day (for the previous year I was prone to skip here and there, anytime my dad was unable to make it). I got into a great routine. I was starting to do high intensity intervals. I cooked all of my meals at home, counting calories. On days my dad couldn't make it, I still went, even though I did not have anyone to be accountable to aside from myself. I got closer and closer and eventually hit 200. This only spurned me on even more. I still remember the joy (and shock) of stepping onto the scale and seeing it sitting at 200. It was the best motivation to exercise I had ever had. I worked even harder, now visiting the gym more often, even weekends. It started to melt off. 197, 195, 190. Suddenly, 180 was not only not impossible, but it was attainable. I was running faster, lifting more. I could now do more than four push-ups in a setting. I could finally do a pull-up (a few actually). Eventually it happened; I hit the impossible 180 lb. mark. I couldn't believe it. I lost an entire goat! I had to buy smaller clothes. I was able to do several pull-ups. I was doing 140 push-ups a day. I was running 5 and 10ks; for fun! I say all this not to brag, because these aren't impressive numbers, relatively speaking, but for me it was a big deal. I hit the 10-mark anniversary of that journey early last year and sometimes it's still hard to imagine I've been working out for an entire decade, something I never thought would happen, when I think about who I used to be. Here's to another 10 years of health, fitness, and keeping the weight off.

Epilogue: I went back to the zoo after losing the weight and stepped on that scale again. 3 goats.
I have to say, that is beyond impressive - congratulations.

I collect quotes that are mostly inspirational in nature. I exercise five days a week myself and there are days I want to skip. When I do I just remember this quote: "You don't have to exercise today. The world need mediocre people too."
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
In the spring of 2008, I was at the zoo with my then-girlfriend and they had a scale you could step on that showed you how much you weighed in terms of chickens, goats, and cow. I stepped on the scale and weighed 4 goats (equivalent to 240 lbs) and immediately balked at that, verbally assuming that the scale must be broken (even at 6'3", I had never previously weighed anywhere near that). Said girlfriend stepped on the scale and said it was accurate. I wept. When did I get so big? Turns out the combination of entering my mid-20s and getting an office job, along with my already sedentary lifestyle of video games, movies, and poor eating habits was a recipe for corpulence. I was unhappy with myself and made some slight changes, like cutting out soda and trying to cook at home more, but made no drastic alterations to my lifestyle. Fast-forward to that December and my dad, who was also quite heavy, had a heart attack. Not long after, the girlfriend and I broke up. Nothing wills one to exercise like being single and watching a close relative in the hospital.

Since my dad had now graduated from "should probably lose weight" to "you're going to die if you do not lose weight" and I was looking to shed some pounds, I told him I would make the drive to go the gym with him, to help keep both of us accountable (It should be noted that prior to this I had never exercised more than a few days in a row). It was tough in the beginning. I would walk for about half an hour on a treadmill, as when I attempted a light jog I was winded in less than five minutes. I eventually got down to 215, which was certainly an improvement, but my goal was 200 lbs, with a stretch goal of 180. I did not actually believe I would ever hit the 180 mark, but I kept it in my back pocket in case pigs started to fly. Eventually I started to do some heavier cardio work and began to lift weights after I was laid off from work and had a lot more time on my hands (I cannot stress enough how out of my wheelhouse this was for me at the time). I got down to 205, but after starting a new job eventually crept back up to 215. I had been so close to 200 but had not quite made it. Now I was sure 180 was an impossibility, but I still wanted to crack 200.

I buckled down. I went to the gym more, never missing a day (for the previous year I was prone to skip here and there, anytime my dad was unable to make it). I got into a great routine. I was starting to do high intensity intervals. I cooked all of my meals at home, counting calories. On days my dad couldn't make it, I still went, even though I did not have anyone to be accountable to aside from myself. I got closer and closer and eventually hit 200. This only spurned me on even more. I still remember the joy (and shock) of stepping onto the scale and seeing it sitting at 200. It was the best motivation to exercise I had ever had. I worked even harder, now visiting the gym more often, even weekends. It started to melt off. 197, 195, 190. Suddenly, 180 was not only not impossible, but it was attainable. I was running faster, lifting more. I could now do more than four push-ups in a setting. I could finally do a pull-up (a few actually). Eventually it happened; I hit the impossible 180 lb. mark. I couldn't believe it. I lost an entire goat! I had to buy smaller clothes. I was able to do several pull-ups. I was doing 140 push-ups a day. I was running 5 and 10ks; for fun! I say all this not to brag, because these aren't impressive numbers, relatively speaking, but for me it was a big deal. I hit the 10-mark anniversary of that journey early last year and sometimes it's still hard to imagine I've been working out for an entire decade, something I never thought would happen, when I think about who I used to be. Here's to another 10 years of health, fitness, and keeping the weight off.

Epilogue: I went back to the zoo after losing the weight and stepped on that scale again. 3 goats.
This was the best thing I've read in a long while, and I read all the time.

Also made me think of my Dad. I miss him every day.

Thank you for posting. Serious question: do you feel like you stopped carrying a full grown goat around? May you continue to be blessed my friend!
 
I have to say, that is beyond impressive - congratulations.

I collect quotes that are mostly inspirational in nature. I exercise five days a week myself and there are days I want to skip. When I do I just remember this quote: "You don't have to exercise today. The world need mediocre people too."
Thanks! I have a couple of mantras that keep me motivated, but that one is delightfully elitist, which is right up my alley. It will be especially handy on those final laps when I am ready to give up.

This was the best thing I've read in a long while, and I read all the time.

Also made me think of my Dad. I miss him every day.

Thank you for posting. Serious question: do you feel like you stopped carrying a full grown goat around? May you continue to be blessed my friend!
Thank you, that is kind of you to say.

To answer your question: yes. The difference in energy is incredible. I sleep better, I feel better, and I have more confidence. The one "downside" is when I cheat and eat too much of something that is terrible for me, I feel it, and it is not fun. That could also just be a by-product of aging.
 

Desmodromic

Contributor
10 years is a fantastic milestone for any business. Congratulations!

About a month back I had my 35th service anniversary for work (General Motors). It was the first time that it really struck me that I'd worked there for what amounts to a pretty damn long time! I've got at least five more years to go (hell, maybe ten!) but it's a job that I really love and I've had the pleasure to work on some great projects over the years, including most recently the new mid-engine Corvette.

I'm thankful to have had the opportunity to impact some great products and have a good deal of fun along the way.
 
contest-winner.jpg

The time has arrived Gentlemen! Random.org has selected our ten winners and they are:

@Timeclo, @Toothpick, @TARHEEL_85, @JCarr, @sneefy, @Lightcs1776, @Ted A, @Graydog, @Tanuki, @1Speedster

If you are a winner go to our website and pick out one item of your choice: All Products — Captain's Choice - https://www.captainschoicestore.com/all

Email us your selection at: [email protected]

When you do, please:

1. Include your avatar / screen name
2. Tell us your selection
3. Please include your shipping address

Thank you to all who have participated and a big thanks to our customers and retailers who have supported us for the past ten years. You are the ones who make it all possible and for that we are grateful.
 
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Wow! Thank you! I will have to determine if my wife gets another lime soap or I get more Nor'Easter, which I used after tonight's shave. I will PM you tomorrow. Thank you!

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
One item of my choice! I will take a $100 gift card please. :lol:

I kid I kid. Thanks for doing this Scott. Please use random.org to pick another winner in my choice. I‘m back in the bearded stage of my life.

I wish you continued success!
 

JCarr

Contributor
I'm thrilled and honored. Thank you for your generosity. And many happy and successful more years for Captain's Choice.
 
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