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Aeropress

Regarding this inverted Aeropress DISK method, isn't the result much like using a Vietnamese drip brewer? Not saying that would be a bad thing.
No. The secret of the Aeropress is :

  • Fast flavor extraction (30s...2min). Could be almost be described as a cold water poor-man's expresso. The heavier aromas still remain in the grind.
  • Double quantity of coffee as with other methods. Higher proportion of short volatile molecules. Smoother brew.
The Vietnamese single cup brewing method is exactly the opposite :

  • Slow brewing (3min-7min). High extraction of caffeine. Harsher brew. This is one reason why, IMHO, the Vietnamese put as much as a quarter to a half sweetened condensed milk in their cup.
  • Economical. Less coffee used. High extraction.
By the way, since at least half of the aromas still remain after the Aeropress process, you can used the grind a second time, in a Vietnamese coffee maker.
 
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I do the inverted method, but with slight modifications:


  • I don't use a chronometer. I stir until a full crema develops , then press slowly with any delay.
  • Before turning the Aeropress over, I let out the air and the crema like this.
  • I use a fine grind, like for expresso.
Total brewing time... maybe 90 seconds.
 
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I do the inverted method, but with slight modifications:


  • I don't use a chronometer. I stir until a full crema develops , then press slowly with any delay.
  • Before turning the Aeropress over, I let out the air and the crema like this.
  • I use a fine grind, like for expresso.
Total brewing time... maybe 90 seconds.
Thanks for the clarification about this method and the Vietnamese drip. I need to research more to understand how this inverted AeroPress method really works, but I get the main idea now.

I cannot explain why I originally had such a wrong impression, which was that I assumed more of a gravity feed and little to no pressure when using this metal mesh DISK. Which obviously would not be inverted from an Areopress brewing point of view.
 
Thanks for the clarification about this method and the Vietnamese drip. I need to research more to understand how this inverted AeroPress method really works, but I get the main idea now.

I cannot explain why I originally had such a wrong impression, which was that I assumed more of a gravity feed and little to no pressure when using this metal mesh DISK. Which obviously would not be inverted from an Areopress brewing point of view.
There was a method put out by the Coava guys with the 010 disk where they didn't actually plunge, but let the coffee drip. This did involve filling the press while inverted, and then flipping it over, removing the plunger, and letting it drip out. With the 008 disk, they changed it a bit (actual plunging), but it still starts with an inverted press.
 
The Aeropress is a giant plastic syringe with a filter instead of a needle. Letting the coffee drip defeats the purpose of having a plunger assembly. Any way, one of the fun with the Aeropress is that you experiment with different techniques.
 
The Aeropress is a giant plastic syringe with a filter instead of a needle. Letting the coffee drip defeats the purpose of having a plunger assembly. Any way, one of the fun with the Aeropress is that you experiment with different techniques.
Nah, it's still very useful in cleaning out the brew chamber. Sure, it has it's primary use-case that the designer prescribes, but it's still a fairly flexible and compact brewing device. It's capable of "clever coffee dripper" type brews, french press type brews, or whatever you call the pressurized brew the maker intended. I wouldn't say it defies the point to experiment.
 
I do the inverted method, but with slight modifications:


  • I don't use a chronometer. I stir until a full crema develops , then press slowly with any delay.
  • Before turning the Aeropress over, I let out the air and the crema like this.
  • I use a fine grind, like for expresso.
Total brewing time... maybe 90 seconds.
Thanks for the clarification about this method and the Vietnamese drip. I need to research more to understand how this inverted AeroPress method really works, but I get the main idea now.

I cannot explain why I originally had such a wrong impression, which was that I assumed more of a gravity feed and little to no pressure when using this metal mesh DISK. Which obviously would not be inverted from an Areopress brewing point of view.
There was a method put out by the Coava guys with the 010 disk where they didn't actually plunge, but let the coffee drip. This did involve filling the press while inverted, and then flipping it over, removing the plunger, and letting it drip out. With the 008 disk, they changed it a bit (actual plunging), but it still starts with an inverted press.
The Aeropress is a giant plastic syringe with a filter instead of a needle. Letting the coffee drip defeats the purpose of having a plunger assembly. Any way, one of the fun with the Aeropress is that you experiment with different techniques.
i also use the plunger with my inverted method. it's really not too difficult to quickly flip it over onto the cup without spilling a drop. total brew time for me is in the neighborhood of two minutes.
 
The Aeropress is a giant plastic syringe with a filter instead of a needle. Letting the coffee drip defeats the purpose of having a plunger assembly. Any way, one of the fun with the Aeropress is that you experiment with different techniques.
The idea behind the Aeropress is a short extraction time with a fine grind, very similar to espresso. So the plunger is needed to insure the brew time remains short.
 
Well, it's still the "intended use" if you're messing with the equation. I've been playing with more water in the press lately with improving results.

Does anybody brew drip coffee in their Aeropress? I've used it on occasion to make a quickie when I didn't have time to wait for a pot or didn't want a full pot. I make it strong and fill the rest of the mug full of water Americano style. Works great!
 
So, anybody who doesn't use it according to Aerobie's instructions is simply doing it wrong and defying the point?
No. Nobody criticized you. Nobody even talked about you. It has nothing to do with you. You can use your Aeropress the way you want. It's yours.

The inventor's CONCEPT, his INVENTION, the IDEA behind the Aeropress is a short extraction time with a piston. That's all we said.

Enjoy your coffee.
 
So, anybody who doesn't use it according to Aerobie's instructions is simply doing it wrong and defying the point?

I'm OK with that, because it brews better coffee when I "do it wrong".
Actually, I'm fascinated by these experiments and I'll give them a try for myself. The worst that could happen is that I screw up a cup of coffee.
 
No. Nobody criticized you. Nobody even talked about you. It has nothing to do with you. You can use your Aeropress the way you want. It's yours.

The inventor's CONCEPT, his INVENTION, the IDEA behind the Aeropress is a short extraction time with a piston. That's all we said.

Enjoy your coffee.
Agreed, it was never "personal" (which is why I spoke in generalizations - I don't even own one anymore). West Bend's idea behind the Poppery was for popping corn. It's still a handy coffee roaster. You get what I'm saying, and I get what you're saying. :thumbup1:
 
The Aeropress contraption is nice, quick, and easy to clean up, but I feel that I get the same if not better results using a dripper cone (Melitta or Beehouse). I'd say that clean up with the dripper is just as easy - toss the filter, rinse the dripper, and you're done.

I also get more cups per bag of coffee using the dripper; I'd say that the Aeropress requires about 1.75 to almost double the amount of beans for the same size cup of coffee at the strength I enjoy. This is important when spending hard earned cash on good beans.
 
The Aeropress contraption is nice, quick, and easy to clean up, but I feel that I get the same if not better results using a dripper cone (Melitta or Beehouse). I'd say that clean up with the dripper is just as easy - toss the filter, rinse the dripper, and you're done.
I find the Aeropress less bitter than a cone.


I also get more cups per bag of coffee using the dripper; I'd say that the Aeropress requires about 1.75 to almost double the amount of beans for the same size cup of coffee at the strength I enjoy. This is important when spending hard earned cash on good beans.
That is what I like the least with an Aeropress. It requires double of the amount of coffee. When I wrote that on the Wikipedia page, the section about the pros and cons of the Aeropress was rewritten : "Uses slightly more finely ground coffee than drip" :censored:
 
I find the Aeropress less bitter than a cone.
Interesting - I am finding the opposite, especially for light-roasted coffees.

"Uses slightly more finely ground coffee than drip" :censored:
This statement is true if you read it a certain way, because I believe the Aeropress is supposed to use coffee that is ground finer (e.g., closer to an espresso grind) than drip coffee usually is. I think we both agree that you must use almost twice the weight of coffee for, say, an 8 ounce cup of Aeropress coffee versus an 8 ounce cup of drip-brewed coffee.
 
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