What's new
  • Guest
    As per our long standing policy of not permitting medical advice on the forum - all threads concerning the Coronavirus will be locked.
    For more info on the coronavirus please see the link below:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

Advice sought on handle crack

My Simpson Colonel (purchased in August) has developed a small handle crack:
F1AC91F3-D003-4CAE-9B7F-88229E6E86C3.jpeg

I contacted the vendor and received a refund, but they didn’t ask for the brush back. Now, I’m not sure what to do with the brush. I could keep it and use it, but I’m concerned the crack may worsen. I see some posts suggesting epoxy, but the crack is so small that I’m not sure I could get any in. Any advice?
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
If you got a refund what’s it matter if the crack worsens. You’ve been compensated for the defect. I may order another one with the refund. Use it until the crack gets bigger and unusable and then toss it. At this point you got a refund so you are out nothing.

I don’t know the first thing about restoration. Like I said, I would just use it until it becomes unuseable. I suspect you will get many years out of it. Otherwise, maybe I’d take a rotary tool and grind it out and then fill it in with epoxy.

Enjoy your free brush!
 
I'm still in the process of working on a Simpson brush with what I suspect in time will develop into a crack in time perhaps. It's funny as the crack is visible to the eye, but it is under the surface of the handle. I thought it was a scratch and tried sanding it out with a dremel, but got a bit more material removed before realizing it wasn't coming out leaving a bit of a hole.

I bought some J-B Weld PlasticWeld to fill the void as using some epoxy putty worked quite well for repairing a broken wheel to a paper shredder, and J-B Weld PlasticWeld looked like it would fit the bill. It sands down quite well, but it dries to a blue color instead of the off white color was advertised. For some reason Testors paint came to mind to try and paint the blue spot, couldn't find any that wasn't white and not glossy, so I bought some Folk Art. Thankfully I didn't apply it directly to the spot before, and tried some paint and could tell the color was no where near what I needed. So right now I'm at the stage of needing to paint the repaired spot after mixing together a bunch of paint to the best of my ability to match the color.

I'll try to get around to this as soon as possible and let you know my own results with it. I should have photos on my phone of my work I've done. The Plasticweld epoxy putty would likely be just what you want to get that crack repaired, but then you'd have a blue spot shown. Note that this is my first time trying any such repair.
 
Hi,

Please return the brush to us with a copy of the proof of purchase enclosed.

We can replace free of charge if within a year of purchase.

This looks to be a case of the epoxy bond between knot & handle swelling at a rate faster than the handle itself, causing the fracture.

This is an inherent risk when soaking a brush in water too hot pre-shave.

If the water is too hot to submerge your hand in for a few seconds, then it’s also too hot for your brush - that’s the general advice we’d suggest.

We’ve also seen this issue when Brushes have been transported overseas in a non-pressurised aircraft hold - often subject to dramatic temperature fluctuations (very rare fortunately).

Many thanks,

Mark
 
I agree with @Toothpick You got a refund, so nothing lost if you just use it until it worsens. If and when it does worsen and if you happen to like the knot, then you can always ask a master-craftsmen to salvage the knot by fitting it into a new handle of your choice (i.e. @Rudy Vey )
 

ajkel64

The Aussie Bulldog
Moderator
Hi,

Please return the brush to us with a copy of the proof of purchase enclosed.

We can replace free of charge if within a year of purchase.

This looks to be a case of the epoxy bond between knot & handle swelling at a rate faster than the handle itself, causing the fracture.

This is an inherent risk when soaking a brush in water too hot pre-shave.

If the water is too hot to submerge your hand in for a few seconds, then it’s also too hot for your brush - that’s the general advice we’d suggest.

We’ve also seen this issue when Brushes have been transported overseas in a non-pressurised aircraft hold - often subject to dramatic temperature fluctuations (very rare fortunately).

Many thanks,

Mark
Pretty good service.
 

BigJ

Ambassador
Hi,

Please return the brush to us with a copy of the proof of purchase enclosed.

We can replace free of charge if within a year of purchase.

This looks to be a case of the epoxy bond between knot & handle swelling at a rate faster than the handle itself, causing the fracture.

This is an inherent risk when soaking a brush in water too hot pre-shave.

If the water is too hot to submerge your hand in for a few seconds, then it’s also too hot for your brush - that’s the general advice we’d suggest.

We’ve also seen this issue when Brushes have been transported overseas in a non-pressurised aircraft hold - often subject to dramatic temperature fluctuations (very rare fortunately).

Many thanks,

Mark
Great customer service!! :a29:
 
I agree withe the earlier poster about super glue (aka CA). I have used it on handles and it worked better than expected.
 
I have a Duke 2 with a very similar crack, except in my case I caused it when replacing the knot. I filled the crack with some clear epoxy (I don't remember which brand), and it has been stable for several years now.
 
Great service from Simpson, next time when I need a new brush, you guy will have my business.

For the crack, you can use a 2 part epoxy. Look for the 5-10 minutes type at most autostore/home improvment store, it's most likely to be clear/clearish in twin tube. Don't get the one for metal.

The trick with epoxy is simple, you have to mask off everything that you don't want to get the glue on. Make sure the mating surface is dry. Mix it properly and fill the crack in with a toothpick.
 
Yes, I agree wholeheartedly. Mark and I exchanged emails after this, and I am super impressed with Simpson’s customer service. Simpson is a class act.
I had an issue with a Simpsons brush last year, and I can't say enough about what a pleasure it was to deal with Mark. So far as I'm concerned they are the standard by which to judge a company's customer service.
 
I've had 8 Simpsons and always had great customer service from Mark. I've not only had him recommend new brushes based on brushes I already owned, but at least one brush I ordered, he personally selected the best of the batch closest to the loft I was looking for. Shipping cost a bit more ordering direct from Simpsons (and it takes longer to get) than from a US vendor, but I was pleased.

My biggest problem with a Simpson brush was lending my old Rover to my son-in-law several years ago who dropped it and took a chunk out of the handle bottom. I still have the chunk, but haven't yet looked into getting it repaired.
 
An update: I received a replacement Colonel today from Mark. I have been so impressed with Mark and Simpson. They make an extremely high quality product and stand behind it. I was already a Simpson fanboy, but I’m even more so now.
 
Hi,

Please return the brush to us with a copy of the proof of purchase enclosed.

We can replace free of charge if within a year of purchase.

This looks to be a case of the epoxy bond between knot & handle swelling at a rate faster than the handle itself, causing the fracture.

This is an inherent risk when soaking a brush in water too hot pre-shave.

If the water is too hot to submerge your hand in for a few seconds, then it’s also too hot for your brush - that’s the general advice we’d suggest.

We’ve also seen this issue when Brushes have been transported overseas in a non-pressurised aircraft hold - often subject to dramatic temperature fluctuations (very rare fortunately).

Many thanks,

Mark
Glad I read this....My water is way too hot when I soak my brushes. Good to know.
 
Top Bottom