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Absinthe: Gentlemanly or not?

Absinthe: Gentlemanly or not

  • Gentlemanly

  • Not Gentlemanly

  • Never had it

  • Tis gentlemanly when imbibed alongside bacon

  • Makes the heart grow fonder


Results are only viewable after voting.
Controversy concerning this drink aside, do you find absinthe to be a gentlemanly drink or not?

I, like most people, originally sought to drink it due to its notoriety. I bought some and originally tried to drink it straight. It tasted like liquorice and burning. Not a good idea. I had one properly prepared with sugar in a martini glass. It was glowing and looked really nice, but, while drinkable, I still found it to be a considerably vile concoction.

I’m curious about what other people think of this drink.
 
I don't know about gentlemanly but I do enjoy the taste/scent of anise. I've always been the one to eat the black jelly beans, black licorice and nyquil never offended me. I tried it once because I received a sample bottle and I enjoyed it. I'm not much one for drinking to get drunk, so occasionally in the evenings I'll drink it properly prepared. Sip it slowly, enjoy the flavors. As always, YMMV
 
I think all the myths about Absinthe have been pretty much disproved. Drink up!

+1. All the myths surrounding wormwood and Absinthe have made a subpar spirit into some sort of "forbidden fruit", much like Cuban cigars here in the states. The difference is that a great deal of Cuban cigars are worthy of the hype.

I don't really consider absinthe "gentlemanly" or "ungentlemanly". Just "trendy" and "overhyped".
 
I voted "not" and did so for 2 reasons. While I have enjoyed absinthe, both legal and contraband, in the past I feel as though it is stigmatized by its having been illegal, regardless of propriety. While gentlemanly consumption of spirits can overcome that singular stigma, as our post-prohibition consumption has illustrated, I don't think in such a short period of time that the spirit can overcome the prohibition stigma and the (also wrong) stigma of "chasing la Fée Verte."

A gentlemanly endeavor tends not be one associated with such a bohemian activity.
 
Doesnt really matter if it's Gentlemanly... The story / myth is awesome. The ritual is inspiring. The outcome rewarding. Its very much like shaving.
 
I voted "gentlemanly" mainly beacause it's used in one of the all-time great cocktails; The Sazerac.

Sipping it with water/sugar/spoon.?... well.... that's a little too "European" for me.
 
I voted "not" and did so for 2 reasons. While I have enjoyed absinthe, both legal and contraband, in the past I feel as though it is stigmatized by its having been illegal, regardless of propriety. While gentlemanly consumption of spirits can overcome that singular stigma, as our post-prohibition consumption has illustrated, I don't think in such a short period of time that the spirit can overcome the prohibition stigma and the (also wrong) stigma of "chasing la Fée Verte."

A gentlemanly endeavor tends not be one associated with such a bohemian activity.

full
 
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I used to get a drink from Colombia called agua diente. We were told to drink it like tequila with salt and lemon. It had an anise taste that was pleasant and not too strong (the taste). The drink itself had about the same kick as real tequila or my neighbor Carl's moonshine.
 
I think it is very gentlemanly when drank the original and french way. you will need

an absinthe fountain
absinthe spoon
sugar
ice water
and an absenthe glass.

All these make for a great ritual that is enjoyed with freinds.
 
While I adore absinthe and have four bottles ATM, nonetheless I have to say that it is not gentlemanly. It was originally a drink of the poor at the time it was banned, and its years of notoriety since then have not done its reputation any favors.

BTW, if anybody ever tries to serve it by dripping it through a sugar cube, stop them before they do something stupid like lighting it on fire. Absinthe is served by pouring it into a glass then dripping cold water into it through a sugar cube, or directly if you prefer it somewhat drier. Lighting an absinthe-soaked sugar cube on fire looks cool but ruins the taste. The servergirl at the Old Absinthe House in the French Quarter tried to do this and I stopped her just in time. Bizarrely, they had a nice-looking old absinthe fountain on the bar that they failed to reactivate once absinthe became legal.
 
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