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A walk on the Mild Side.

I got the new recoil spring and striker spring for the old Mauser 1914 yesterday and changed them out so decided to take it to the range and see if all was much better now. It kindasorta was but the original magazine now was not feeding reliably (maybe the 91 year old magazine spring was an issue) but the new magazine worked flawlessly.

That was always going to be a quick test so jess for fun I brought along three of my 22LR semi-automatics; an old Beretta 21A Bobcat from the late 1990s, a fairly new Taurus PT-22 Poly and my new Walther Ulm (but Cologne proofed) PPK/S 22LR. I also took three types of the 22LR ammo I had squirreled away to see how each pistol handled different ammo. The ammo was CCI Mini Mag Target, Federal Target bulk pack and Remington 525 Golden Bullet "Value Pack" which was the only HP round I tried.

The Beretta was like Mikey, it hated everything except the CCI Mini Mag. With the Mini Mag though it was absolutely flawless. Next best with the Bobcat was the Federal Target and the only issue there was a few simply didn't fire. All showed a deep strike and two of the four that did not fire the first time did fire on a second strike.

The Taurus PT-22 Poly like the CCI Mini Mag and the Federal Target but would simply not feed the Remington. Not a single round would feed from the magazine but all that I loaded directly did fire.

The Walther PPK/s 22LR ate everything and I only had one round out of about 125 rounds total fail to fire. It was by far the most forgiving with no failure to ejects, no failure to feeds and as I said only one (a Remington) fail to fire. I tried that round in both of the tip up barrels and while I got good hits on the rim in all three guns it never worked.

All three were super easy to shoot and accurate. At 5 yards it was easy to place a full magazine in a inch and a half square even with rapid fire. The Walther is the heaviest while the Taurus PT-22 Poly the lightest. The Beretta and Walther are both traditional DA/SA and the Taurus is DAO. The Beretta and Taurus sights are simply milled into the slide and barrel while the Walther comes with three different height front sights (pined in place) and the rear sight is windage adjustable using an Allen Wrench that also came with the gun. The Walther barrel is threaded and capped and comes with a wrench to allow attaching a compensator or blast re-directer or suppressor.

All three easily fit in a pocket, all have a manual safety, all have a button magazine release but the Bobcat is located in the left rear grip while the other two have the magazine release in a more conventional location.

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All were comfortable enough to use over a moderate range session and all were accurate enough to put a shot on target at 25 yards but none were fun to shoot at distance.

The only issue that came up was one I was already aware of, the trigger pin in the Taurus will move slightly to the right over a range session. It's never come out or caused any issues and it is easy to simply push back in place.

We all know that 22LR, even today's more powerful and reliable 22LR, is not the best choice for self defense but these three little jewels were so intuitive, so easy to put and maintain on target and with ammo they like so reliable and accurate that I'd be comfortable with any one of them as a primary carry handgun.

In summary, the Bobcat with CCI Mini Mag ammo was the easiest to conceal, easiest to shoot, most reliable over all without a single failure to feed, failure to eject or failure to fire. Next was the Walther. While it's the heaviest and has by far the heaviest DA trigger pull (think vintage S&W J frame trigger pull) it was smooth and had no staging or hesitations and the SA trigger on the Walther was simply fantastic. It was a short pull with crisp break and almost immediate reset. The Taurus was the least pleasant with a trigger that is too curved, too rounded and somewhat vague. It works though and it's only when directly compared to others during a single session I find issues.
 
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Well tonight I took the old magazine apart and cleaned the insides and pieces parts. Amazing what was in there. It is literally noticeably lighter now. I'll give it a try at the range Monday and see if just a clean was enough or if I need to try to find new magazine springs for it. I have some mag springs for Makarovs and Sig P230s and also S&W single stack 380s which may well fit and will likely try those before ordering more springs.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
I wub Walthers. My tiny TPH disappears in a pocket and works like a Swiss watch.

Do you ever get the famous Walther slide bite with the PPK/S?
 

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I wub Walthers. My tiny TPH disappears in a pocket and works like a Swiss watch.

Do you ever get the famous Walther slide bite with the PPK/S?


Same with my little TPH, accurate at about 25 feet, about as far as i have shot it. I really quit carrying it after I got a Sig P935. In the couple of years i have been carrying it, pocket carry, no one has noticed it. I never got any slide bite out of my PPK.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
I get some slide bite at times with the TPH if I hold it deeper in my hand with the meaty part of my hand by the slide, and I don't have big hands and I am for sure not fat. But those things are like a tiny piece of me ladies jewelry.

Some people say they have problems with functioning with the TPH, but mine has been great. I think they are out of production now. I looked up the prices of used ones on gunbroker and they are about twice what I paid for it.

Would like to have a blued PPK in .32 like Bond...just cause. I have a German .32 though.
 
I wub Walthers. My tiny TPH disappears in a pocket and works like a Swiss watch.

Do you ever get the famous Walther slide bite with the PPK/S?
Not from the PPK/S or my PP but every PPK I've ever owned was a Slice-n-Dice.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Those are nice choices, for sure!

And .22s attract dirt ... And pocket pistols, dust bunnies ... But a .22 in the hand is worth gold, if you need it.

AA
 
More ammo tests today but just with the Bobcat. Today I tried two different Aguila rounds; Super Extra and Super Maximum; and also some CCI Velocitor and some Remington Thunderbolt. I only tried 25 rounds of each but still the results were pretty conclusive. Between each type the bore and face were swabbed and dried.

Neither Aguila was reliable with Failures to Feed and Failures to eject being the common and consistent problem. It was an issue almost every other round. There were also two Failure to Fire. Two of four magazines were used and both showed a similar failure pattern.

Surprisingly the Remington Thunderbolt were very reliable with One Failure to Feed as the very first round. I kept the case and at the end loaded it back in the magazine and it chambered and fired.

The CCI Velocitors had two Failure to Feed. In both instances putting it back in the magazine resulted in a feed, fire & eject.

In all three Failure to Feed the round came in nose above the chamber. Interestingly one is an HP while the other is a Round Nose so HP vs Round Nose is not the issue. Two magazines were involved and so it is also not a particular magazine issue.
 
Nice review of the 3 .22's you have

I've always liked the .22 wether it's a rifle, pistol or Revolver. Can plink with them all day.

Hope to come across a Walther PPK\S in .22 I don't see them around anymore.

My only Beretta is a model 21A. Have noticed it seems to like CCI ammo the best as well as the Remington Thunderbolts too.

Maybe next summer when it warms up a bit. I'll take my .22s pistols and revolvers out and do a review like yours.
 
"Thunderduds." An auto that eats those ain't picky!


AA
My experience with Remington ammo has been like the the Little Girl, who had a little curl...

There was a little girl,
Who had a little curl,
Right in the middle of her forehead.
When she was good,
She was very very good,
But when she was bad she was horrid

With both Thunderbolt and Golden Bullet I find big differences from batch to batch. When it's good it's very very good but when it's bad it is horrid. Fortunately over the years I've been luck to have found mostly good batches.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
My experience with Remington ammo has been like the the Little Girl, who had a little curl...



With both Thunderbolt and Golden Bullet I find big differences from batch to batch. When it's good it's very very good but when it's bad it is horrid. Fortunately over the years I've been luck to have found mostly good batches.

And fortunately for me, I have a .22 revolver which eats *anything.*

AA
 
I have a bobcat 21a that I use on certain trap lines. Great gun with mini mags. The tip up barrel for single shots is spectacular. Great way to get rid of other brands of ammo on the trap line.
 
Not a mini gun, but I shot my S&W M41 last week. I have been using some Geco ammo, made by RWS, labeled optimized for bolt action guns. I think it is rather a standard velocity ammo, I noticed when shooting out of my Marlin Mountie I could barely hear the report, and at first thought I had a misfire until I blew down the barrel and saw smoke. My S&W was a little on the dry side, so had a couple of ejection failures until the existing lube got spread around then it ran fine. I like the ammo and bought about 4 cases so I have the same lot to compare across a variety of 22's.
 
Still on the Mild Side are my 25acps. Almost identical in performance to modern 22LR and maybe just slightly more reliable the 25acp is yet another good choice in small handguns that would be used at BBD (Bad Breath Distance).

One that is among the few guns semi-automatics I'm comfortable carrying in my pocket even without a holster is my Beretta 1919. In the James Bond novels 007's handgun of choice was a Beretta 418 which is the final version of the 1919. In "Dr. No" 'M' takes it away from Bond and tells him to carry a Walther PPK.

Interestingly in the movie what is shown being taken away is a larger Beretta 1934 or 1935 which was either 380 or 32acp and what Bond is given is also the larger Walther PP and not the smaller PPK.

Here's my 1919 most likely made in 1922 or 1923.

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Another true mouse gun that often gets carried but always in a pocket holster is my FN Browning 1906. It has a shorter grip than the Beretta but very similar in overall size.

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They have other similarities as well. Both were designed for the 6.35 round (25acp), they are both single action striker fired and both have a manual safety and a grip safety. The little Beretta holds one more round than the FN, 7+1 instead of 6+1. Neither has anything that could legitimately be called sights but since they are meant to be used either from the waist or chest high and close to the body that's really not an issue.

Both of the manual safeties are designed to swipe down for the "fire" position even though on the FN it in the classic rear position while the Beretta is forward of the grip. The motions are the same though so moving between them is not an issue.

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Of the two, the Beretta allows a full two fingers on the grip while the FN is a single finger style. Recoil is almost non-existent and so double taps usually result in a single ragged hole. The both use a heel release for the magazine and there the FN is clearly nicer. Pushing the heel release back ejects the magazine enough that it will not get caught and pulls out cleanly. With the Beretta you must continue to hold the release back as you pull out the magazine.
 
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