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A small rant about home work.

All I remember is I paid around $600 for textbooks for one semester. When I sold (gave) them back to the bookstore I got $140.
I'm pretty sure they make more profit off selling used textbooks than new ones.
I always buy used textbooks If that is an option, the most I've paid is $182 for one text book. I try to sell my books to other students for a decent price but that's not always an option.
 
Shawn,
are you at all interested in the philosophy of mathematics or just pure mathematics?
m
Mark,

My degree path is a mix of pure and applied mathematics. I struggled in pure math classes like group theory, ring theory, topology, and real analysis, the applied math classes were much more enjoyable for me. Until you asked the question I had not given much thought to the philosophy of mathematics. The answer to your question is neither, I'm interested in applied mathematics and I'm also interested in how people learn and retain math.
 
I may be a fool, But I greatly Question the usefulness of collage now If you are not studying in a hard and applied field.
If I could live my life over again and knew what was on the road ahead of me I would have gotten into a trade, I don't know any unemployed plumbers or electricians.
Then you can use the money you make in your trade to take collage classes.

The other thing about trade school is the classes are more relevant to every day life.
Pay attention to day we will show you witch wires will kill you if you touch them or how a table saw can remove your hand if your not careful, sort of grab your attention.
+1 and I have 12 years of post high school academic experience from which to reflect.
 
it's always been the English department, the math department has never done anything like this.
That's because the important departments do not have to make themselves feel important by assigning extra work :001_smile

In my experience (I finished undergrad a year ago and graduate school two months ago), the importance of a class is inversely related to the amount of busy work assigned. YMMV.
 
Only about 10% of those doing research contribute to their field of knowledge "Prof Scam" an interesting book. "Keep that money coming; I am on the threshold of something astounding."

Selling your books is akin to "standing in line to be robbed." You wonder what the sellers buy that is as precious as what the sell.

Many textbooks appear to be written by individuals who cannot express themselves graphically. Perhaps a remedial course in composition would be of value.

Rating faculty members should be encouraged; I told them what I thought of the course(s) and the way they were taught and was an excellent student with an outstanding attorney who would take them to court if they retaliated academically. Documentation is/was useful in these endeavors and I complimented 90%+ more than criticized; also stayed in touch with them throughout their lives and am grateful for their efforts and having known them. Sincerest thanks to you and to those not longer with us; may you rest in peace. Does it seem that good people make good pedagogues?
 
I keep thinking about going back to school. I will be the tallest kid in Kindergarten!


My worst teachers in college were the grad student ones. We had one that he would spend the whole lecture period talking about the evils of walmart.
 
...My worst teachers in college were the grad student ones. We had one that he would spend the whole lecture period talking about the evils of walmart.
Some of my best were grad students and some of the worst were grad students. No different than the faculty. As with all things, YMMV.
 
I need to rant about the semester that starts on Monday.

Over the last two weeks I've already received 14, yes 14 emails from my communications professor and the professor that runs the communication lab. 14 emails, and a home work assignment that's due on the first day of class. The home work was assigned 10 days ago via email and multiple emails have gone out to remind us that it's due and what we need to do in order to complete the assignment and be successful in this class. A few of the emails also explain why this class is going to be one of THE most important classes that I'll ever take in college and how this class will change the way I think and improve my life FOREVER! This is not the first time I've been assigned home work before the semester starts and it's always been the English department, the math department has never done anything like this. Part of what makes me so angry about this is that I already know that the first day is going to be a huge waste of time and the only thing that will get accomplished is that the students will pick their seats for the semester. To make sure that I appreciate this class even more, my text book cost $138 and it's a work book in a three ring binder, we turn in pages from the work book so at the end of the semester I'll have a nice half inch three ring binder instead of a text book that I could possible sell and recoup some of my money.

I also got an email telling me that my parking lot has been closed down permanently so I need to find somewhere else to park.

Welcome to the new semester...
One of the best textbooks I ever purchased was a three-ringed binder, a pre-publication version of Dr Eldert Bowden's of "Economics - The Science of Common Sense." It changed my life.

Seriously.
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
An anonymous student wrote of my class that "he even made Hegel fun".
That's not too hard, actually ...



... you just spell her name a little differently is all.

All I remember is I paid around $600 for textbooks for one semester. When I sold (gave) them back to the bookstore I got $140.
I'm pretty sure they make more profit off selling used textbooks than new ones.
When I was in University, I took courses where most of the "textbooks" were actual "real books" that people would read for fun, rather than specifically for students. Okay ... most people's idea of "fun" doesn't include comparing biographies of Lord Palmerston, but still.

But those textbooks written specifically for students ... ugh. Oh, and you have to love how they issue new editions every few years ... basically shuffle the chapters and insert different examples ... to keep the used book market at bay.
 
But those textbooks written specifically for students ... ugh. Oh, and you have to love how they issue new editions every few years ... basically shuffle the chapters and insert different examples ... to keep the used book market at bay.
I had always thought that was the case as well. But then when I mentioned this to someone (current college student) she told me than in some cases it was because soon after the new edition appears, all of the problems can be found, worked out in detail, on the web. Don't know what to think except that I am sure the publishers want to destroy the used book market.

Fortunately, as an adult didact learner, I can always use the older editions if they are not too much older. Save about 90% on the cost.
 
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