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22lr Aguila Interceptor + PPK/S KABOOM

Sorry about your hand, and your Walther. Looks like it could have been a lot more serious.

I have 6 Walthers. None of them are rimfires. I can't speak for Walther, but I have a feeling they'll tell you that you're using ammunition way outside the pressure specifications the pistol was designed for. I quote from my manuals:

"Use only commercially manufactured with internal ballistic pressures which are in strict accordance with the specifications of the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers' Institute (SAAMI). If you are uncertain, contact your ammunition supplier for verification."

Further...

"Plus-P-Plus" (+P+) ammunition must not be used in WALTHER firearms. This marking on the ammunition designates that it exceeds established industry standards, but the designation does not represent defined pressure limits and therefore such ammunition may vary significantly as to the pressures generated."

As a manufacturer, Walther generally discourages the use of high velocity or "hot" ammunition in any of their firearms. This warning is in ALL of my manuals that came with my pistols. I don't think you'll get much sympathy from them about the damage to your pistol.
 
Sorry about your hand, and your Walther. Looks like it could have been a lot more serious.

I have 6 Walthers. None of them are rimfires. I can't speak for Walther, but I have a feeling they'll tell you that you're using ammunition way outside the pressure specifications the pistol was designed for. I quote from my manuals:

"Use only commercially manufactured with internal ballistic pressures which are in strict accordance with the specifications of the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers' Institute (SAAMI). If you are uncertain, contact your ammunition supplier for verification."

Further...

"Plus-P-Plus" (+P+) ammunition must not be used in WALTHER firearms. This marking on the ammunition designates that it exceeds established industry standards, but the designation does not represent defined pressure limits and therefore such ammunition may vary significantly as to the pressures generated."

As a manufacturer, Walther generally discourages the use of high velocity or "hot" ammunition in any of their firearms. This warning is in ALL of my manuals that came with my pistols. I don't think you'll get much sympathy from them about the damage to your pistol.
The PPK is a bit tricky, it's very ammo sensitive: half of the available rounds will not cycle the slide. I wasn't trying to be an outsider. Someone had posted a question which 22 was better/accurate and I just decided to try what was available in my car...and this was one of them (the last I was trying out). My dad had a pp in 22 and that was the first I ever used, hence my interest for this one.
 
The PPK is a bit tricky, it's very ammo sensitive: half of the available rounds will not cycle the slide. I wasn't trying to be an outsider.
No finger pointing from my end, I assure you. Pretty hot round you were using. I still think the round was the problem, not the pistol.
 

jar_

Contributor
The PPK is a bit tricky, it's very ammo sensitive: half of the available rounds will not cycle the slide. I wasn't trying to be an outsider. Someone had posted a question which 22 was better/accurate and I just decided to try what was available in my car...and this was one of them (the last I was trying out). My dad had a pp in 22 and that was the first I ever used, hence my interest for this one.
The different experiences with the Walther PPK/s is interesting but raises far more questions than it has answered.

Of the few 22LR pistols I own my Walther PPK/s is really the most forgiving of all when it comes to ammo. It simply has never found a brand or type that it does not like. It shoot all the various Remington, CCI, Federal, Aguila, bulk pack or container pack pretty much equally. True there is the occasional one that doesn't fire but even there they seem to work if given a "redo".

The PPKs that I have experienced were all slice-n-dice so I can't address those and my PP experience is all 32acp.
 
Correct me if I'm mistaken,
Two different PPK/s , Two different brands of ammo, Two case blowouts, (one catastrophic). Given, one brand of ammo was of a higher velocity, hence the catastrophic damage.
Is it beyond the realm of possibility that the firearm could be the issue?
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Correct me if I'm mistaken,
Two different PPK/s , Two different brands of ammo, Two case blowouts, (one catastrophic). Given, one brand of ammo was of a higher velocity, hence the catastrophic damage.
Is it beyond the realm of possibility that the firearm could be the issue?
No.
 
Correct me if I'm mistaken,
Two different PPK/s , Two different brands of ammo, Two case blowouts, (one catastrophic). Given, one brand of ammo was of a higher velocity, hence the catastrophic damage.
Is it beyond the realm of possibility that the firearm could be the issue?
Interesting.....when the 1st one had the catastrophic failure, I looked and found one for sale (new). I asked my brother if I should just get it.... he said: NO, I think those are garbage now and it's a waste of $$. I still got it, and to be candid : I regret it.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
PPQ runs almost all ammo, I think most of failures are with poor made 22lr ammo.
It just sucks all around. I'm so glad you weren't seriously injured my friend. So MANY things could have gone wrong. I think we might ALL be surprised at how Walther handles this. A bad reputation is something all gun manufacturers hate.
 
No doubt there is plenty of bad 22lr ammo out there, but the odds of one person having similar issues with different brands of ammo in two different firearms of the same model has to be astronomical.
 

jar_

Contributor
Correct me if I'm mistaken,
Two different PPK/s , Two different brands of ammo, Two case blowouts, (one catastrophic). Given, one brand of ammo was of a higher velocity, hence the catastrophic damage.
Is it beyond the realm of possibility that the firearm could be the issue?
That is always a possibility but to find out requires far more data than just two instances particularly when the second instance seems to have had no ill effects on the pistol and the owner continued to use it during that range trip.
 

jar_

Contributor
No doubt there is plenty of bad 22lr ammo out there, but the odds of one person having similar issues with different brands of ammo in two different firearms of the same model has to be astronomical.
But according to what was posted the two incidents were only very remotely similar.

I also wonder about the second instance. Was the second purchase from a dealer as a new firearm or was it a sale of a gun said to be new.
 
Found this in a forum:
I had to send a recent ppk/s .22 purchase back - according to Walther it needed a new barrel and slide - both out of stock.

I too was disappointed. I made it thru less than 4 mags - First shot fired, but did not eject. Second shot ejected but did not feed another. Jam, stove pipe, fail to eject and so on non stop.

Finally gave up after 2 case ruptures. Case exploded out the back primer.

Stripped it to find out barrel was obstructed at the front. It was narrower than .22 because my .22 cleaning rod couldn't even fit thru it.

Now that the barrel arrived, (3 weeks later) I get a call from Walther and they say it needs a new slide as well, AND THEY ONLY HAVE SILVER SLIDES in stock. I bought a black ppk/s just in case that wasn't clear.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
That is always a possibility but to find out requires far more data than just two instances particularly when the second instance seems to have had no ill effects on the pistol and the owner continued to use it during that range trip.
Very stinkin' strange! I'll bet ya a nickel if I'd have shot it out of one of my 22 revolvers I'd have never known there was an issue. Just weird all around.
 
But according to what was posted the two incidents were only very remotely similar.

I also wonder about the second instance. Was the second purchase from a dealer as a new firearm or was it a sale of a gun said to be new.
Possibly, the reason the second incident was not as bad as the first is that he was using much milder ammo.
 

jar_

Contributor
Possibly, the reason the second incident was not as bad as the first is that he was using much milder ammo.
Yes, there are a whole host of possibilities but right now there is simply too little data to hazard a guess at the actual cause.
 
That is always a possibility but to find out requires far more data than just two instances particularly when the second instance seems to have had no ill effects on the pistol and the owner continued to use it during that range trip.
That would hold true for the ammo as well wouldn't it?
I'm not saying it is the firearm, although the empirical evidence would lean that way. I'm saying to simply dismiss that possibility totally might be a mistake?
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Yes, there are a whole host of possibilities but right now there is simply too little data to hazard a guess at the actual cause.
My guess: stick to revolvers!


My hour at the gun store yesterday told me ALL I need to know about handguns: I'm too stupid to be trusted with any invention beyond the wheel.
 

jar_

Contributor
That would hold true for the ammo as well wouldn't it?
I'm not saying it is the firearm, although the empirical evidence would lean that way. I'm saying to simply dismiss that possibility totally might be a mistake?
So far though no evidence has been presented that the cause was the firearm.

There have been suppositions and inferences but zero evidence.
 
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