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2020 New models of electric shavers

I actually still use a DE occasionally (nostalgia), so have a foot in both camps, but there's no denying the convenience, safety, speed and comfort (for me) of an electric. And probably as important, the uniformity and predictability of an electric shave. You'll read in the DE world "had a bad shave this morning." And you well might - shaky hand, dull blade, rushed, phase of the moon - but there's no "bad shave" with an electric (except for the random DE shaver that writes "I broke out my Grandad's 1950 Remington with the broken foil for the first time and it was terrible!"). An electric shave is the same, every morning. Undeniably not as close as a DE, but I find now after 50 years of looking in the mirror every morning, close enough. Way.
 
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I was into wet shaving with a DE for many years and went down the route of getting Muhles, a Futur and the Gillette classics like the Superspeed, the Rocket and the adjustable Slim and Fatboy. As much as I liked the whole process and acquisition of new, cool DE razors, I have a tough beard and it was always a struggle to get a super comfortable shave on a daily basis.

So about two years ago, I pivoted to a Braun Series 7 and changed the shaving frequency from every day to every other day or once in three days. I’m very curious about the performance of the new 7 series … is the 360 degree functionality (with what looks to be a Series 3 head) just a Procter & Gamble marketing ploy or did PG leverage a large R & D budget to actually come up with something that works better? I’ll be monitoring the reviews section of ShaverCheck (Electric Shaver Reviews • ShaverCheck - https://shavercheck.com/reviews/) and B & B to find out.
 
I actually still use a DE occasionally (nostalgia), so have a foot in both camps, but there's no denying the convenience, safety, speed and comfort (for me) of an electric. And probably as important, the uniformity and predictability of an electric shave. You'll read in the DE world "had a bad shave this morning." And you well might - shaky hand, dull blade, rushed, phase of the moon - but there's no "bad shave" with an electric (except for the random DE shaver that writes "I broke out my Grandad's 1950 Remington with the broken foil for the first time and it was terrible!"). An electric shave is the same, every morning. Undeniably not as close as a DE, but I find now after 50 years of looking in the mirror every morning, close enough. Way.
You have hit the nail right on the head. Shaving every day with a modern electric shaver will produce uniform results in the minimum of time. Obviously, a wet shave with a real blade will probably be closer. However, if you are going out at night after an early morning shave, you can easily do a quick touch up shave in an even shorter period of time. Normally it takes me about 5 minutes to get a very close shave 24 or so hours after a previous shave.
 
I was into wet shaving with a DE for many years and went down the route of getting Muhles, a Futur and the Gillette classics like the Superspeed, the Rocket and the adjustable Slim and Fatboy. As much as I liked the whole process and acquisition of new, cool DE razors, I have a tough beard and it was always a struggle to get a super comfortable shave on a daily basis.

So about two years ago, I pivoted to a Braun Series 7 and changed the shaving frequency from every day to every other day or once in three days. I’m very curious about the performance of the new 7 series … is the 360 degree functionality (with what looks to be a Series 3 head) just a Procter & Gamble marketing ploy or did PG leverage a large R & D budget to actually come up with something that works better? I’ll be monitoring the reviews section of ShaverCheck (Electric Shaver Reviews • ShaverCheck - https://shavercheck.com/reviews/) and B & B to find out.
You are asking the $64,000 question. I don’t think that PG has made a significant improvement in the shaver’s ability to shave any closer, but has opened the door to increase profits through the sale of accessories. One member here has one and has promised a review over the weekend.
 
On a side note... I'm super proud of the recently growing love for Electrics around here. DEs and Straights are cool but we all have different needs and situations and for some of us an electric is the answer. I know a large majority of members here will scoff at us but in the end... Electric users are people too!
Same here, it is nice to have a place to share our experiences with electrics in the sea of wet shaving, and nice people at that.
 
Has anyone seen prices on the replacement cartridges? I didn't see them listed anywhere and am curious to see what they will go for. I looked again and I swear the new 5, 6, & 7 have the same foil/blade cartridge with the 7 just being silver instead of black. All of the additional motions found in the 6 & 7 are functions of the piece the cartridge attaches too and not the cartridge itself. I am a little suspicious of the assembly used for all of those motions as well... One good drop on a tile floor and that 6 & 7 are probably shot. I firmly believe that I could have slammed my old series 7 against the wall and it would be fine, the series 3 and 9 can handle normal drops without a problem (I know lol).
Because Braun won’t have to sell any cutter/screen cassettes for at least a year, they won’t disclose the price of replacements. If a new shaver’s cassette fails then they will replace it or replace the entire shaver under the warranty. I think they withhold the price so as not to discourage new shaver sales. Currently, they recommend replacing the cassette every 18 months. Some users may want to replace the cassette after 12 months. Possibly these new shavers may not require a replacement for two years.

I will be surprised if my seven series shaver’s cassette doesn’t provide great shaves longer than 18 months. Only time will provide the answer.
 
Aaaand warts and all, my impressions - from initial use. Rather lengthy, but the first couple of paragraphs have the beef, with following details for those that want. Currently using as my morning shaver.

So – the Braun Series 7 7071. First, it's immediately recognizable as a Braun – very ergonomic, comfortable shape, rubberized “grippy" back, signature 3 stage head with two outer foils and a flat center cutter in a familiar Braun cassette. Cosmetically very similar, but that said, it's unlike any of the prior Series shavers that Braun has produced. Although touted as the “new" Series 7, it could be more accurately characterized as a “Series 10,” or a Series 8 if another shaver didn’t already occupy that slot (and the Series 8 is really just a modified 9). There is nothing else like it. The elevated 360 degree swiveling head and detachable trimmer are the signature features of this shaver.

Skipping to the bottom line if you want to bypass the details, it delivers a great shave, smooth and comfortable, as good as the older Series 7 (which was excellent) or the Series 9 (which some think is better). Whether it is better than either is completely subjective - for me, probably not – but the cutters and head (that actually provide the shave) are virtually identical to other Braun offerings, which in general are outstanding. Advantages: it's cheaper than either shaver. From the Series 7, a little. From the Series 9, a lot. It's slightly faster shaving – with the 360 head, fewer passes, easier to maneuver, and it’s lighter by more than 10 percent. Disadvantages: for some, the detachable trimmer. It does require “fiddling" with this attachment if you use a trimmer, rather than just raising or lowering an attached trimmer. And no head lock - if you use this feature, it’s missing in this shaver.

20200124_180317.jpg

General specifications:
In size, somewhere between the old Series 7 and the Series 9, although closer to the 9. Slimmer than either, it weighs in at a svelte 6.6 oz, with the Series 7 at a hefty 7.8 oz and the Series 9 just behind at 7.7 oz, although you will note that the Series 9 is a considerably larger razor, with the extra weight of the old Series 7 accounted for by thicker plastic, more metal parts and a more robust build than either the 9 or the 7071.

The cassette head of the 7071 is actually larger than the Series 7 head, with a wider flat cutter bar. It has a flatter profile as well, and there appear to be no replacements currently available, with replacement costs also unknown. Ergonomically, it feels perfectly balanced, like most of the Brauns. It's substantially plastic, also like all the newer Brauns (and most modern electrics), but the connecting struts for the swivel arrangement appear to be made of metal. There is a charging port in the end for either cord charging or in the provided cleaning station, and a full charge takes about an hour, with a 5 minute charge for one shave. The charge is reportedly good for 50 minutes. Unlike the Series 9 and earlier Brauns, the charging cord is straight rather than coiled, and fairly long. The shaver is submersible and can be used wet or dry, so cannot be used as a corded shaver, in common with the rest of its rechargeable wet/dry relatives.

The display is very basic, with a single vertical line indicating charge level - the shorter the line, the lower the charge. No percentages here. This is actually pretty functional, because I find I never pay much attention to my shavers that do display precise percentages – I generally charge them with every use at home, and when traveling as often as I can. The display also includes icons for cleaning required (two droplets), head replacement (a head shaped icon), and a red lock icon and charge cord icon (when the shaver is locked or charging). Like other Brauns, the shaver can be locked by holding down the power button for 3 seconds, and unlocked the same way. An info button below the main power button displays the status of the shaver when pressed. There is no speed adjustment like the older Series 7, being “automatically“ adjusted for beard thickness like the Series 9. Noise is about the same for shaver or cleaning station as the other Brauns.

Accessories:
The cleaning station is also a departure from Braun's newer cleaning stations. This station is actually closer in function and appearance to the Philips Norelco stations, with a vertical arm that locks in and charges the shaver, rather than just dropping the shaver into the station. Unlike the Norelco stations however, or the other Braun cleaning stations, you can't just charge the shaver in the station – when you press the button on the vertical arm (which you must to lock in the shaver) it begins a cleaning (and charging) cycle, and a second press disconnects the shaver from the charger. There are no icons or indicators at all on the cleaning station – just a blue light on the Start button which comes on when the shaver is cleaning or charging. A plus - like all Braun stations from the Series 7 on - it uses the same alcohol-based cleaning cartridges. The cleaning cycle takes about the same amount of time (less than 3 minutes), and unlike in the Series 7 or 9 stations, there is no active drying cycle - induction or fan – just “drip-dry.” Which, considering the cleaning solution is mostly alcohol, actually works pretty well.

Also unlike all the other Braun Series shavers, there us no built-in trimmer – the trimmer is an attachment that must be clicked on and off like the Norelco rotaries. A plus and a minus – easy to replace (presumably if made available), but an extra step and bother when shaving. This however follows the “new" Braun design of having multiple attachments for the shaver – face brush and beard trimmer for example – again very similar to Norelco's “system" design.

And unique to this Braun, there is no head lock button or mechanism – the head swivels freely (mainly in the back-and-forth dimension of other Brauns, but also laterally and up and down, although more stiffly – hence the “360” designation). And unlike on other Brauns, there is no cassette release button – the cutter cassette and other attachments are removed and replaced essentially by “yanking" them off and “snapping” them on, which you must do with each shave if you use the trimmer, and it does take a bit of force. Head and attachments appear to be firmly attached, but not what you may be accustomed to if you’re a prior Braun user, and wear on the swivel mechanism is likely a legitimate concern with this design. Time will tell. Overall, a good addition to Braun's Series lineup - not really a replacement for any of them, but an addition to, depending on what you want in a shaver. There are plenty of choices between them, and the "new" Series 7 adds another - and a good one.
 
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Aaaand warts and all, my impressions - from initial use. Rather lengthy, but the first couple of paragraphs have the beef, with following details for those that want. Currently using as my morning shaver.

So – the Braun Series 7 7071. First, it's immediately recognizable as a Braun – very ergonomic, comfortable shape, rubberized “grippy" back, signature 3 stage head with two outer foils and a flat center cutter in a familiar Braun cassette. Cosmetically very similar, but that said, it's unlike any of the prior Series shavers that Braun has produced. Although touted as the “new" Series 7, it could be more accurately characterized as a “Series 10,” or a Series 8 if another shaver didn’t already occupy that slot (and the Series 8 is really just a modified 9). There is nothing else like it. The elevated 360 degree swiveling head and detachable trimmer are the signature features of this shaver.

Skipping to the bottom line if you want to bypass the details, it delivers a great shave, smooth and comfortable, as good as the older Series 7 (which was excellent) or the Series 9 (which some think is better). Whether it is better than either is completely subjective - for me, probably not – but the cutters and head (that actually provide the shave) are virtually identical to other Braun offerings, which in general are outstanding. Advantages: it's cheaper than either shaver. From the Series 7, a little. From the Series 9, a lot. It's slightly faster shaving – with the 360 head, fewer passes, easier to maneuver, and it’s lighter by more than 10 percent. Disadvantages: for some, the detachable trimmer. It does require “fiddling" with this attachment if you use a trimmer, rather than just raising or lowering an attached trimmer. And no head lock - if you use this feature, it’s missing in this shaver.

View attachment 1055969

General specifications:
In size, somewhere between the old Series 7 and the Series 9, although closer to the 9. Slimmer than either, it weighs in at a svelte 6.6 oz, with the Series 7 at a hefty 7.8 oz and the Series 9 just behind at 7.7 oz, although you will note that the Series 9 is a considerably larger razor, with the extra weight of the old Series 7 accounted for by thicker plastic, more metal parts and a more robust build than either the 9 or the 7071.

The cassette head of the 7071 is actually larger than the Series 7 head, with a wider flat cutter bar. It has a flatter profile as well, and there appear to be no replacements currently available, with replacement costs also unknown. Ergonomically, it feels perfectly balanced, like most of the Brauns. It's substantially plastic, also like all the newer Brauns (and most modern electrics), but the connecting struts for the swivel arrangement appear to be made of metal. There is a charging port in the end for either cord charging or in the provided cleaning station, and a full charge takes about an hour, with a 5 minute charge for one shave. The charge is reportedly good for 50 minutes. Unlike the Series 9 and earlier Brauns, the charging cord is straight rather than coiled, and fairly long. The shaver is submersible and can be used wet or dry, so cannot be used as a corded shaver, in common with the rest of its rechargeable wet/dry relatives.

The display is very basic, with a single vertical line indicating charge level - the shorter the line, the lower the charge. No percentages here. This is actually pretty functional, because I find I never pay much attention to my shavers that do display precise percentages – I generally charge them with every use at home, and when traveling as often as I can. The display also includes icons for cleaning required (two droplets), head replacement (a head shaped icon), and a red lock icon and charge cord icon (when the shaver is locked or charging). Like other Brauns, the shaver can be locked by holding down the power button for 3 seconds, and unlocked the same way. An info button below the main power button displays the status of the shaver when pressed. There is no speed adjustment like the older Series 7, being “automatically“ adjusted for beard thickness like the Series 9. Noise is about the same for shaver or cleaning station as the other Brauns.

Accessories:
The cleaning station is also a departure from Braun's newer cleaning stations. This station is actually closer in function and appearance to the Philips Norelco stations, with a vertical arm that locks in and charges the shaver, rather than just dropping the shaver into the station. Unlike the Norelco stations however, or the other Braun cleaning stations, you can't just charge the shaver in the station – when you press the button on the vertical arm (which you must to lock in the shaver) it begins a cleaning (and charging) cycle, and a second press disconnects the shaver from the charger. There are no icons or indicators at all on the cleaning station – just a blue light on the Start button which comes on when the shaver is cleaning or charging. A plus - like all Braun stations from the Series 7 on - it uses the same alcohol-based cleaning cartridges. The cleaning cycle takes about the same amount of time (less than 3 minutes), and unlike in the Series 7 or 9 stations, there is no active drying cycle - induction or fan – just “drip-dry.” Which, considering the cleaning solution is mostly alcohol, actually works pretty well.

Also unlike all the other Braun Series shavers, there us no built-in trimmer – the trimmer is an attachment that must be clicked on and off like the Norelco rotaries. A plus and a minus – easy to replace (presumably if made available), but an extra step and bother when shaving. This however follows the “new" Braun design of having multiple attachments for the shaver – face brush and beard trimmer for example – again very similar to Norelco's “system" design.

And unique to this Braun, there is no head lock button or mechanism – the head swivels freely (mainly in the back-and-forth dimension of other Brauns, but also laterally and up and down, although more stiffly – hence the “360” designation). And unlike on other Brauns, there is no cassette release button – the cutter cassette and other attachments are removed and replaced essentially by “yanking" them off and “snapping” them on, which you must do with each shave if you use the trimmer, and it does take a bit of force. Head and attachments appear to be firmly attached, but not what you may be accustomed to if you’re a prior Braun user, and wear on the swivel mechanism is likely a legitimate concern with this design. Time will tell. Overall, a good addition to Braun's Series lineup - not really a replacement for any of them, but an addition to, depending on what you want in a shaver. There are plenty of choices between them, and the "new" Series 7 adds another - and a good one.
Thanks for this great review. From the photo it appears that the 7071 shaving head is as large as the series 9 shaver or is that just an optical illusion? Does the 360 degree swiveling head make it easier to keep the head at the proper 90 degree angle to all the surfaces of your face than either the series 7 or 9? That feature seems to be the only purpose for the 360 degree swiveling function. I guess the bottom line is, does the closeness or faster speed of the 7071 make it worth the extra money to upgrade from your current series 7 or series 9 shavers? Are you interested in purchasing any of the other attachments? I personally have no interest in buying any of the attachments and would not like having to switch the head for the trimmer. I use the pop up trimmer a couple of times a week to trim my mustache. Does removing the head to attach the trimmer require cleaning the cuttings from the cassette?

I doubt Braun will continue to make the previous series 7 or series 5 shavers? They aren’t mentioned on Braun’s website and they appear to be discontinued.
 
@Scaramouche Wow man, thanks! Wonderful review. You answered several questions I had without even having to ask them. That's a nice looking $500 family of shavers you have there haha. I too can see that 360 flex head not having the best longevity especially if it's dropped or, at minimum, becomes "stiff" from soap (if used wet) and hair buildup. Its easy to rinse that head out but I doubt you'll ever clean that swivel mechanism fully.

@Flyboybob I could see it going either way. They keep some of their older designs to have a rounded portfolio OR they slowly move everything to these new designs.
 
Thanks for this great review. From the photo it appears that the 7071 shaving head is as large as the series 9 shaver or is that just an optical illusion? Does the 360 degree swiveling head make it easier to keep the head at the proper 90 degree angle to all the surfaces of your face than either the series 7 or 9? That feature seems to be the only purpose for the 360 degree swiveling function. I guess the bottom line is, does the closeness or faster speed of the 7071 make it worth the extra money to upgrade from your current series 7 or series 9 shavers? Are you interested in purchasing any of the other attachments? I personally have no interest in buying any of the attachments and would not like having to switch the head for the trimmer. I use the pop up trimmer a couple of times a week to trim my mustache. Does removing the head to attach the trimmer require cleaning the cuttings from the cassette?

I doubt Braun will continue to make the previous series 7 or series 5 shavers? They aren’t mentioned on Braun’s website and they appear to be discontinued.
:adoration: I confess, like "RAD" (Razor Acquisition Disorder), there is also "SAD" (Shaver Acquisition Disorder). Electric shavers, from all vintages and manufacturers, just seem to accumulate in my house.

The head is indeed closer to the width of the Series 9 (about 1"), just missing the Titanium flat cutter but the 7071 cutter is wider than Braun's other flat cutters. It's noticeably wider than the Series 7 (3/4"), so if you like the smaller size and maneuverability of the old Series 7 head, or lower model Brauns, this one takes some adjustment (just like the Series 9). I was concerned about the flexibility of the head, anticipating something like the Panasonic LV heads (which are sort of "floppy" until you get used to them - which you may never do). It's actually fairly stiff in the lateral range of motion, so behaves a lot like the "normal" Braun heads, with just that little bit of play in other dimensions that it keeps the head relatively perpendicular to your skin surface. This seems to allow a pretty close shave, and definitely easier to get around contours, but I couldn't say it's a closer shave than the Series 9 for example - it just takes less time, for me. I do miss the locking head around sideburns and upper lip, but it's stiff enough that it compensates, and does eliminate another mechanism to break.

If you didn't own a Series 7 or 9 - or were ready to replace one, I would definitely purchase this one, because the cost/value is a better proposition IMO. If you already own a 7 or a 9, you might find this one is not a huge improvement. My experience with the Norelco attachments are that they don't approach the utility or build of their stand-alone counterparts - face brush and beard trimmer for example. They work, but just. On Braun's attachments, the only one I've used is the trimmer, and it actually is pretty good - I'd say better than any attached trimmer I've used on Braun or other models, and actually better than Norelco's detachable trimmer. The advantage of a detachable trimmer again is that you don't have to purchase a new razor to replace it, but I doubt I'd replace my Clarisonic brush with the Braun brush, although it might be handy traveling.

Someone at Braun definitely considered the little things with regard to ergonomics (likely from customer feedback). The cord attachment to the cleaning station used to be a pain to connect - it had a low angle relative to the back to allow it to be pushed close to a wall or mirror, but was fiddly to connect. On this station, you can plug it straight in perpendicularly, then snap the connection down to achieve the same effect. The shaver has a slight flat raised portion on the back, that allows you to put the razor down on a flat surface and it stays flat and doesn't rock (like the Series 9). The shaver cord plug configuration allows you plug it into a wall socket right, left or vertical, depending on the socket orientation, and occupy the least socket real estate. And it doesn't have the huge multi-voltage configuration of some earlier Braun plugs. It's the little things that count.

One concern is the method of removal of the cassette, mentioned before. That's actually how you get Norelco's line of heads off, but this one requires a pretty hefty pull. Since it's attached to the swivel mechanism, I can see the possibility of damaging the rotating mechanism, but it does seem to be a pretty robust part, with metal struts connecting it. It's simple to swap out - just pop off one and pop on the other (turning off the shaver of course). Isn't particularly messy or complicated. Overall, I'm impressed, and I didn't expect to be. I would guess that Braun will slowly replace their existing line with this concept if it catches on, and there's no reason it shouldn't.
 
:adoration: I confess, like "RAD" (Razor Acquisition Disorder), there is also "SAD" (Shaver Acquisition Disorder). Electric shavers, from all vintages and manufacturers, just seem to accumulate in my house.

The head is indeed closer to the width of the Series 9 (about 1"), just missing the Titanium flat cutter but the 7071 cutter is wider than Braun's other flat cutters. It's noticeably wider than the Series 7 (3/4"), so if you like the smaller size and maneuverability of the old Series 7 head, or lower model Brauns, this one takes some adjustment (just like the Series 9). I was concerned about the flexibility of the head, anticipating something like the Panasonic LV heads (which are sort of "floppy" until you get used to them - which you may never do). It's actually fairly stiff in the lateral range of motion, so behaves a lot like the "normal" Braun heads, with just that little bit of play in other dimensions that it keeps the head relatively perpendicular to your skin surface. This seems to allow a pretty close shave, and definitely easier to get around contours, but I couldn't say it's a closer shave than the Series 9 for example - it just takes less time, for me. I do miss the locking head around sideburns and upper lip, but it's stiff enough that it compensates, and does eliminate another mechanism to break.

If you didn't own a Series 7 or 9 - or were ready to replace one, I would definitely purchase this one, because the cost/value is a better proposition IMO. If you already own a 7 or a 9, you might find this one is not a huge improvement. My experience with the Norelco attachments are that they don't approach the utility or build of their stand-alone counterparts - face brush and beard trimmer for example. They work, but just. On Braun's attachments, the only one I've used is the trimmer, and it actually is pretty good - I'd say better than any attached trimmer I've used on Braun or other models, and actually better than Norelco's detachable trimmer. The advantage of a detachable trimmer again is that you don't have to purchase a new razor to replace it, but I doubt I'd replace my Clarisonic brush with the Braun brush, although it might be handy traveling.

Someone at Braun definitely considered the little things with regard to ergonomics (likely from customer feedback). The cord attachment to the cleaning station used to be a pain to connect - it had a low angle relative to the back to allow it to be pushed close to a wall or mirror, but was fiddly to connect. On this station, you can plug it straight in perpendicularly, then snap the connection down to achieve the same effect. The shaver has a slight flat raised portion on the back, that allows you to put the razor down on a flat surface and it stays flat and doesn't rock (like the Series 9). The shaver cord plug configuration allows you plug it into a wall socket right, left or vertical, depending on the socket orientation, and occupy the least socket real estate. And it doesn't have the huge multi-voltage configuration of some earlier Braun plugs. It's the little things that count.

One concern is the method of removal of the cassette, mentioned before. That's actually how you get Norelco's line of heads off, but this one requires a pretty hefty pull. Since it's attached to the swivel mechanism, I can see the possibility of damaging the rotating mechanism, but it does seem to be a pretty robust part, with metal struts connecting it. It's simple to swap out - just pop off one and pop on the other (turning off the shaver of course). Isn't particularly messy or complicated. Overall, I'm impressed, and I didn't expect to be. I would guess that Braun will slowly replace their existing line with this concept if it catches on, and there's no reason it shouldn't.
Hopefully, I won’t be in the market for a new shaver in the next five or more years. By the time I’m ready to replace my series 7 who knows what will be available. Having to remove the cassette to snap on the trimmer reduces the value of the cleaning station. I remove the cassette daily to clean out the cuttings. If I’m going to shave first before trimming my mustache, then I might as well just tap out the clippings. Of course you could trim first. I assume that the cassette may be hard to remove because it’s new and it may loosen up over time.

I did notice that the Series 3 and 9 shavers are still available on their website along with a series 8 if you don’t like or think that feature is useful. I think that only the new series 7 has the 360 degree swiveling feature. Right now their line of shavers numbering system seems confusing.

Thanks again and keep us updated on how you enjoy your new shaver.
 
So for head shaving if you had to take a guess: Arc5 or this new Model 7 Brown???
Not a head shaver, but just from my use I would think the Arc 5 would work better - the head is more flexible and provides a closer shave, and is larger so covers more area. Again, haven't tried as a head shaver, but I suspect either would work.
 
Absolutely, well said.



Awesome, I look forward to hearing!

On a side note... I'm super proud of the recently growing love for Electrics around here. DEs and Straights are cool but we all have different needs and situations and for some of us an electric is the answer. I know a large majority of members here will scoff at us but in the end... Electric users are people too!
I agree 100%! Regardless of the blade guys opinions on electric shavers, we are a sizable group that need a forum to discuss electric shavers and this seems to be a good place. Maybe we can get the forum moderator to give us are own section.
 
:adoration: I confess, like "RAD" (Razor Acquisition Disorder), there is also "SAD" (Shaver Acquisition Disorder). Electric shavers, from all vintages and manufacturers, just seem to accumulate in my house.

The head is indeed closer to the width of the Series 9 (about 1"), just missing the Titanium flat cutter but the 7071 cutter is wider than Braun's other flat cutters. It's noticeably wider than the Series 7 (3/4"), so if you like the smaller size and maneuverability of the old Series 7 head, or lower model Brauns, this one takes some adjustment (just like the Series 9). I was concerned about the flexibility of the head, anticipating something like the Panasonic LV heads (which are sort of "floppy" until you get used to them - which you may never do). It's actually fairly stiff in the lateral range of motion, so behaves a lot like the "normal" Braun heads, with just that little bit of play in other dimensions that it keeps the head relatively perpendicular to your skin surface. This seems to allow a pretty close shave, and definitely easier to get around contours, but I couldn't say it's a closer shave than the Series 9 for example - it just takes less time, for me. I do miss the locking head around sideburns and upper lip, but it's stiff enough that it compensates, and does eliminate another mechanism to break.

If you didn't own a Series 7 or 9 - or were ready to replace one, I would definitely purchase this one, because the cost/value is a better proposition IMO. If you already own a 7 or a 9, you might find this one is not a huge improvement. My experience with the Norelco attachments are that they don't approach the utility or build of their stand-alone counterparts - face brush and beard trimmer for example. They work, but just. On Braun's attachments, the only one I've used is the trimmer, and it actually is pretty good - I'd say better than any attached trimmer I've used on Braun or other models, and actually better than Norelco's detachable trimmer. The advantage of a detachable trimmer again is that you don't have to purchase a new razor to replace it, but I doubt I'd replace my Clarisonic brush with the Braun brush, although it might be handy traveling.

Someone at Braun definitely considered the little things with regard to ergonomics (likely from customer feedback). The cord attachment to the cleaning station used to be a pain to connect - it had a low angle relative to the back to allow it to be pushed close to a wall or mirror, but was fiddly to connect. On this station, you can plug it straight in perpendicularly, then snap the connection down to achieve the same effect. The shaver has a slight flat raised portion on the back, that allows you to put the razor down on a flat surface and it stays flat and doesn't rock (like the Series 9). The shaver cord plug configuration allows you plug it into a wall socket right, left or vertical, depending on the socket orientation, and occupy the least socket real estate. And it doesn't have the huge multi-voltage configuration of some earlier Braun plugs. It's the little things that count.

One concern is the method of removal of the cassette, mentioned before. That's actually how you get Norelco's line of heads off, but this one requires a pretty hefty pull. Since it's attached to the swivel mechanism, I can see the possibility of damaging the rotating mechanism, but it does seem to be a pretty robust part, with metal struts connecting it. It's simple to swap out - just pop off one and pop on the other (turning off the shaver of course). Isn't particularly messy or complicated. Overall, I'm impressed, and I didn't expect to be. I would guess that Braun will slowly replace their existing line with this concept if it catches on, and there's no reason it shouldn't.
BTW how much larger is the travel case than the one for the series 9? Does it have room for the trimmer attachment or the other attachments? Braun’s website only offers this shaver with the cleaning station. I wonder if they will offer a version without the cleaning station?
 
BTW how much larger is the travel case than the one for the series 9? Does it have room for the trimmer attachment or the other attachments? Braun’s website only offers this shaver with the cleaning station. I wonder if they will offer a version without the cleaning station?
The travel case is actually slimmer and smaller than the Series 9 case, and does have a slot behind the shaver for the trimmer (still not the cord). I should also mention it came with the standard Braun "half-moon" brush. I believe the 7020s and 7027cs are the stand-alone versions without the cleaning station, and there is a 7075cc that comes with the beard trimmer attachment. One thing of note, which may or may not be true - on previous "stand-alone" models ('s' rather than 'cc' suffix) if you had a Braun cleaning station, these wouldn't work - no connecting studs in the back. In the new configuration, the vertical arm of the cleaning station is actually a connector that plugs into the standard charging port of the shaver, so theoretically, any shaver in this line should work with the cleaning station. Making it possible, for example, to have a "home" shaver and station, and a cheaper no-frills travel shaver that you can just pop in the station when you get home for a final cleaning. Or, if you wanted to try the shaver without the station and later decided to get one, you could.

I do see that Braun is going to offer other attachments related to beard grooming, so if you have a beard you regularly maintain, that might be something of interest (I find the trimmer attachment pretty effective - although relatively lightweight even compared to the Norelco trimmer - and it does get easier to attach/detach). Interestingly, unlike the Norelco, you can attach the trimmer facing either way, allowing more flexibility in trimming more than just sideburns - moustache trimming for instance.

And - second shave - I find I'm actually really liking the whole "flexy" thingy: it really does follow facial contours very well, particularly my neck, and makes getting hard to manage areas much easier, producing a more uniform shave with almost no effort. I also found you can push too hard on this razor trying to get it to flex - and like the flex head Arc 5, it will remind you, not in a good way. Ironically, because of all the electrics I've used, this one is effective with the lightest touch, and you really don't need to press hard at all. More practice!

It also occured to me that I should have mentioned in my original report that I shave exclusively wet - brush, scuttle and soap - so all my comments are in that context. So far with A&E's Asian Pear and T+S's Himalaya, outstanding shaves with both - probably as close as, or nearly, as my Panasonic LV razors, which I believe provide the closest shave of any electric. I may get weaned off DE razors completely! :001_smile More to follow, and I'll weigh in after a few weeks with the final verdict, but so far this has replaced my other electrics as a daily shaver, and may stay there. Glad I took the leap.
 
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@Scaramouche thanks for the great review, you answered a lot of question for me especially about the 360 head I was worried it was going to be like you said the Panasonics that are very floppy.

Side note, just ordered a Series 7 7071 off of ebay brand new in the box for $99 with free shipping, that exactly what I paid for the Series 6 I just bought. The Series 6 is going for $52 with free shipping thats almost 50% off. The 7017 should be here by Thursday. Going to see if the the heads are interchangeable between the 6 & 7.
 
The travel case is actually slimmer and smaller than the Series 9 case, and does have a slot behind the shaver for the trimmer (still not the cord). I should also mention it came with the standard Braun "half-moon" brush. I believe the 7020s and 7027cs are the stand-alone versions without the cleaning station, and there is a 7075cc that comes with the beard trimmer attachment. One thing of note, which may or may not be true - on previous "stand-alone" models ('s' rather than 'cc' suffix) if you had a Braun cleaning station, these wouldn't work - no connecting studs in the back. In the new configuration, the vertical arm of the cleaning station is actually a connector that plugs into the standard charging port of the shaver, so theoretically, any shaver in this line should work with the cleaning station. Making it possible, for example, to have a "home" shaver and station, and a cheaper no-frills travel shaver that you can just pop in the station when you get home for a final cleaning. Or, if you wanted to try the shaver without the station and later decided to get one, you could.

I do see that Braun is going to offer other attachments related to beard grooming, so if you have a beard you regularly maintain, that might be something of interest (I find the trimmer attachment pretty effective - although relatively lightweight even compared to the Norelco trimmer - and it does get easier to attach/detach). Interestingly, unlike the Norelco, you can attach the trimmer facing either way, allowing more flexibility in trimming more than just sideburns - moustache trimming for instance.

And - second shave - I find I'm actually really liking the whole "flexy" thingy: it really does follow facial contours very well, particularly my neck, and makes getting hard to manage areas much easier, producing a more uniform shave with almost no effort. I also found you can push too hard on this razor trying to get it to flex - and like the flex head Arc 5, it will remind you, not in a good way. Ironically, because of all the electrics I've used, this one is effective with the lightest touch, and you really don't need to press hard at all. More practice!

It also occured to me that I should have mentioned in my original report that I shave exclusively wet - brush, scuttle and soap - so all my comments are in that context. So far with A&E's Asian Pear and T+S's Himalaya, outstanding shaves with both - probably as close as, or nearly, as my Panasonic LV razors, which I believe provide the closest shave of any electric. I may get weaned off DE razors completely! :001_smile More to follow, and I'll weigh in after a few weeks with the final verdict, but so far this has replaced my other electrics as a daily shaver, and may stay there. Glad I took the leap.
Thanks for the follow up report. It would be interesting to shave dry one morning and report the results. Yes, they do make a 7020s model without the cleaning station.

Braun now has an an interesting line up of shavers. The high end series 9, the series 8 that only comes with a cleaning station and touts that it’s designed for sensitive skin. Then the swiveling head series 7. I wonder what’s different about about the head on the series 6 that makes it better for sensitive skin? The series 5 looks similar to the series 6 but with a door to easily rinse out the head and doesn’t offer a cleaning station. Then, there’s the venerable series 3 that comes in three varieties one of which can be used with attachments. The new head allows the three elements, screens and comb to individually articulate to follow the contours of your face. The new models are available in different colors and interestingly only the series 9 and 8 shavers on their site expressly state they are made in Germany. The lower models state they are designed in Germany.

Along with the series 1, which I assume is still available, this new line of Braun shavers seems to offer something for everyone.
 
@Scaramouche thanks for the great review, you answered a lot of question for me especially about the 360 head I was worried it was going to be like you said the Panasonics that are very floppy.

Side note, just ordered a Series 7 7071 off of ebay brand new in the box for $99 with free shipping, that exactly what I paid for the Series 6 I just bought. The Series 6 is going for $52 with free shipping thats almost 50% off. The 7017 should be here by Thursday. Going to see if the the heads are interchangeable between the 6 & 7.
Wow! That’s a great price. That’s what I paid for my 7983s at Costco last April. Is the one you are getting include the cleaning station. Let us know how you like it.
 
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