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1⅝ Puma SR Restoration

I don't bother with water or oil on a blade.
I will use water on scales sometimes depending on what they're made of CA finish for example but not wood.
 
If I see any red oxide, I sand with WD-40. Otherwise, with or without oil is personal preference. I would not recommend using water as you would want to make sure none remained in the pivot hole.

220/240 might remove more of the black oxide. When you get to 2000, the blade begins to take on a sheen. My normal progression is 220/240, 400, 800, 1200, 2000 and 2500 followed by 00 and 0000 steel woool, followed by Mothers polish.

Frank
 
If I see any red oxide, I sand with WD-40. Otherwise, with or without oil is personal preference. I would not recommend using water as you would want to make sure none remained in the pivot hole.

220/240 might remove more of the black oxide. When you get to 2000, the blade begins to take on a sheen. My normal progression is 220/240, 400, 800, 1200, 2000 and 2500 followed by 00 and 0000 steel woool, followed by Mothers polish.

Frank
I do not have access to >2000 W&D, 00 and 0000 steel wool or Mother's polish. I was thinking that after 2k W&D I would use 0.5μm diamond paste, that I do have.
 
I do not have access to >2000 W&D, 00 and 0000 steel wool or Mother's polish. I was thinking that after 2k W&D I would use 0.5μm diamond paste, that I do have.
To be honest 2k is enough to make it super smooth and shiny. For that extra boost I sometimes use micromesh up to 12k but 12k on a blade really isn't necessary, on scales yeah but not the blade.
Mother's is just metal polish, and any metal polish will do. I'd imagine any hardware store would have some.
With metal polish it really is a rinse and repeat exercise, keep rinsing and repeating until you're A) Happy or B) sick of it.
 
Do you intend taking this apart?
For an optimal clean you'd really need to disassemble it but if it's your first time I'd do it on another razor or even 2 icepop sticks.
I would like to dismantle the SR, particularly at the pivot pin, so as to give the blade a good cleanup. Yes, it will be my first time. This is my cheapest SR (USD 10) so I thought that it would be a good one to learn repinning on.

No drilling should be required. My thinking is that all I have to do is file the peening on the pivot pin and remove it to disassemble the blade from the scales. Once the blade is cleaned up, I would reassemble and fit a new brass pivot pin.
 
To be honest 2k is enough to make it super smooth and shiny. For that extra boost I sometimes use micromesh up to 12k but 12k on a blade really isn't necessary, on scales yeah but not the blade.
Mother's is just metal polish, and any metal polish will do. I'd imagine any hardware store would have some.
With metal polish it really is a rinse and repeat exercise, keep rinsing and repeating until you're A) Happy or B) sick of it.
I should have access to Brasso but I am not sure if that will work on high cardon steel.
 
I would like to dismantle the SR, particularly at the pivot pin, so as to give the blade a good cleanup. Yes, it will be my first time. This is my cheapest SR (USD 10) so I thought that it would be a good one to learn repinning on.
Good, you're all in then.
While you say this is your cheapest that's just cause you managed to get it cheap, Puma's are relatively rare and highly sought after. I know from some of your previous posts attention to detail is important to you and you may not forgive yourself if you mess it up. It is of course your razor so it's totally up to you though but just bare it in mind. You may never see another one.
I don't mean to sound preachy but I just wanted to mention it for your consideration before you started something you'll have to see through to the end.
No drilling should be required. My thinking is that all I have to do is file the peening on the pivot pin and remove it to disassemble the blade from the scales. Once the blade is cleaned up, I would reassemble and fit a new brass pivot pin.
Depending on how mushroomed the pin is I think you may loose a collar filing it off. The pin will deform as you file and you'll have no option but to start filing the collar itself so if you go this route try and keep the showside collar 100% intact. (Closely examine both sides and see which one is in the best condition) This means when you're filing the non-showside to disassemble put something protective under the showside so as not to scratch it up, a folded rag or anything will do.
I've done enough of these to know that once the pin has been filed flush to the collar that doesn't mean it'll just pop apart. Then you're in the delema of do you try to pry it or use a punch to drive the pin through. Both options can lead to broken scales.
 
@Bevel thank you for the guidance and advice. I will have a serious think about this repinning while waiting for the materials to arrive. They are still about 2 or 3 weeks away.
 
Exactly, you can get it fully cleaned up and shave ready and then finish it off when the pinning gear arrives.
Puma's are great. I have a #9 and it's up there with my best razors.

Polarbeard is the real expert on Puma's and has a collection that is second to none.
 
To start with I would drill the head off the pin to save the collar, then file it down with tape over the pin to protect the scales.

Then comes the problem of the pin coming out without damage to the scales, but I use a thin metal shim with a slot to pass past the pin then wiggle the blade to see if it becomes loose.

If it has then get a thin blade screwdriver or a thin scraper and use that to lift the scale, in a big section to spread the force on the scales so the pin doesn't crack them once it's moved your on your way it's just getting the pin to move without damage to the scales.
 
Any automotive metal polish will polish steel from a 1k sanded finish. But that razor is Cell Rot pitted, the scales will need to be replaced.

When you see rusty pins and collars it is usually Cell Rot off gassing. That style of Faux Ivory is notorious for cell rot. A black blade is also a cell rot indicator, it may not hold an edge. Try to hone an edge on it before you invest a lot of time restoring a razor that the edge crumbles.

The easiest way to unpin without damaging scales is to file a flat on the pin head, punch a center hole and drill with a single flute 1/16th in Center Drill in a drill press, (couple dollars). Often you can drill the pinhead and save the collar with a few light taps light taps.

A 1/16-inch Center Drill is twice as thick as a drill bit and will not flex, the single flute will track and drill a straight starter hole, once you have a good, centered starter divot, use a drill bit, the bit will then drill a straight hole.

If you try to drill with just a 1/16-inch drill bit, it will flex and likely skip off the center punch hole and into the scale.
 
I do not have access to >2000 W&D, 00 and 0000 steel wool or Mother's polish. I was thinking that after 2k W&D I would use 0.5μm diamond paste, that I do have.

2000 grit wet/dry is good enough. 00 and 0000 steel wool makes a difference and is worth tracking down. I have used both Flitz and Mothers. They both do the same thing. The Flitz is a liquid and the Mothers is a paste.
 
This afternoon I spent a couple of hours sanding the blade with 320 W&D with a little water. Here is where I am up to:

BEFORE
IMG_20211013_123425.jpg
IMG_20211013_123443.jpg

AFTER
IMG_20211026_160809.jpg
IMG_20211026_160832.jpg
This is going to be very slow work. I will try for a few more hours with 320 to see if I can get more of the black out of the blade. Once I have done my best with the 320, I will move up to the 600 and 1k W&D.

I'm thinking that I might hone this blade up to shave-ready and shave with it before I proceed much further. It would be a pity to put a lot of effort into a SR only to find that I can't get it to shave properly.
 
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You are definitely making progress! Looks like you may have about reached the limit of what 320 can remove. For comparison, here's an old Wade & Butcher before and after about two hours using 100 grit. I seldom start higher than 220/240.

The remaining black oxide on your blade should not be an issue. When you get to 1500 the blade begins to take on a sheen, and at 2000 it will look pretty darn good.

Before.

1635249829665.png

After two hours using 100 grit wet/dry.

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