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Glenfiddich 15

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When the contest for the Glencairn glasses was announced, I decided it was finally time to submit a whisky review to the good old B&B. I also knew that the first one I wanted to review was…. Glenfiddich 15.

Now I know what you are thinking, ‘That old stuff? That’s what I pour on my Cheerios.’ (Come on, admit it, I can’t be the only one.) Glenfiddich is what many of us cut our single malt teeth on, the single malt Scotch that every liquor store will have available even if it’s the only one.

It is ubiquitous, and familiarity breeds contempt. It’s like the spouse of thirty years that doesn’t seem as exciting as all of the young, pretty girls that seem to be everywhere, sporting special finishes and such.

And that’s a shame, because Glenfiddich is a damn good whisky.

There is a lot of history behind the brand, but what is most important to me is that the single malt revolution was essentially created by Glenfiddich. Not so very long ago, drinking Scotch whisky meant drinking a blend. Worried about losing their influence and market with the big blending houses, Wm. Grant and Sons decided to market Glenfiddich as a single malt. Without this move, many more of the smaller distilleries that have since found a loyal market as single malts would certainly have eventually closed. I, and every other single malt enthusiast, owe them a great deal of gratitude for this alone.

But Glenfiddich 15 is a superb malt in its own right. The colour is a rich amber, perhaps suspiciously so. A few long, slim legs form quickly, but with patience a string of pearls follows. There is clearly some substance here, despite the unfortunate chill-filtering.

The nose is rather complex. The first sniffs easily reveal characteristic citrus and fruity notes; lemon, peach, melons, ripe pears. Explore deeper, however: cinnamon, nutmeg, mint, raisins, a hint of allspice, and some salt. Like approaching the Spice Islands from downwind.

The first impression of the palate is sweetness and light. Definitely not a harsh or biting whisky, the mouthfeel is like silk, but very intense. Barley sugar, mint and cinnamon again, orange and dried fruits, plus a little grassiness. The flavour is very consistent with what was promised on the nose.

The finish is surprisingly long and warm. There is a some dryness from the wood, and strawberries with cream.

Glenfiddich is often described as a ‘beginner’s Scotch,’ and that’s very true. It is approachable and non-threatening, and a great introduction to single malts. But I would invite you to put aside your pre-conceived notions and taste it with a fresh perspective, and fall in love all over again.

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Thanks for such a thorough review. I for one will be picking up a bottle of this shortly. Just your description of it alone makes it worthy of another go.
When the contest for the Glencairn glasses was announced, I decided it was finally time to submit a whisky review to the good old B&B. I also knew that the first one I wanted to review was…. Glenfiddich 15.

Now I know what you are thinking, ‘That old stuff? That’s what I pour on my Cheerios.’ (Come on, admit it, I can’t be the only one.) Glenfiddich is what many of us cut our single malt teeth on, the single malt Scotch that every liquor store will have available even if it’s the only one.

It is ubiquitous, and familiarity breeds contempt. It’s like the spouse of thirty years that doesn’t seem as exciting as all of the young, pretty girls that seem to be everywhere, sporting special finishes and such.

And that’s a shame, because Glenfiddich is a damn good whisky.

There is a lot of history behind the brand, but what is most important to me is that the single malt revolution was essentially created by Glenfiddich. Not so very long ago, drinking Scotch whisky meant drinking a blend. Worried about losing their influence and market with the big blending houses, Wm. Grant and Sons decided to market Glenfiddich as a single malt. Without this move, many more of the smaller distilleries that have since found a loyal market as single malts would certainly have eventually closed. I, and every other single malt enthusiast, owe them a great deal of gratitude for this alone.

But Glenfiddich 15 is a superb malt in its own right. The colour is a rich amber, perhaps suspiciously so. A few long, slim legs form quickly, but with patience a string of pearls follows. There is clearly some substance here, despite the unfortunate chill-filtering.

The nose is rather complex. The first sniffs easily reveal characteristic citrus and fruity notes; lemon, peach, melons, ripe pears. Explore deeper, however: cinnamon, nutmeg, mint, raisins, a hint of allspice, and some salt. Like approaching the Spice Islands from downwind.

The first impression of the palate is sweetness and light. Definitely not a harsh or biting whisky, the mouthfeel is like silk, but very intense. Barley sugar, mint and cinnamon again, orange and dried fruits, plus a little grassiness. The flavour is very consistent with what was promised on the nose.

The finish is surprisingly long and warm. There is a some dryness from the wood, and strawberries with cream.

Glenfiddich is often described as a ‘beginner’s Scotch,’ and that’s very true. It is approachable and non-threatening, and a great introduction to single malts. But I would invite you to put aside your pre-conceived notions and taste it with a fresh perspective, and fall in love all over again.
Aroma
4.00 star(s)
Price
3.00 star(s)
Value
4.00 star(s)
Flavor
4.00 star(s)
Quality
4.00 star(s)
Packaging
5.00 star(s)

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ginantonix
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