Watch Cleaning

Discussion in 'The Haberdashery' started by BeeSeeDub, May 29, 2012.

  1. Would amonia/water and a toothbrush be ok to clean a metal watchband? If not, what should I be using?
     
  2. What are you trying to clean off of it?
     
  3. I would use it if it's all I had. I assume you mean a mild dilution. Or heavy dilution. How would you say that? Very little ammonia, lots of water. Afterall, most jewelry cleaners have ammonia in it.
     
  4. Legion

    Legion Moderator Emeritus

    I would avoid ammonia as it can corrode some metal. Plain old soapy water and a toothbrush should do the job most times.
     
  5. just an accumulation of gunk behind the clasp...I'll give it a whirl w/o amonia fisrt.

     
  6. I just started wondering if something like ballistol would be good for cleaning watch bands followed by a soap and water scrub down. I mean, it's used for guns and straight razors.

    But yeah, if the soap and water doesn't work, a solution with <10% ammonia (5% would be strong enough) is a good next step.
     
  7. Dish detergent.If you really care about your watch...VERAET..It's made for cleaning watches. Great stuff.
    WWW.VERAET.COM
     
  8. I submerse my watch bracelets, with the watch detached of course, in water in a ramekin. Add a liberal amount of dish detergent (not automatic dishwashing detergent) and place the whole thing into the microwave for about a minute. Let it cool and rinse clean. You'll be amazed at how much just plain filth comes off and how clean and shiny your bracelet looks. I've always felt that dirt can act as an abrasive and cause watch bracelets to wear prematurely. I do this regularly and keep my bracelets scrupulously clean.
     
  9. +1 on the veraet, I use it once a week or so. Maybe once a month, I detach my metal bracelets, and then give them a sonic cleaning.
     

  10. How does that work, a metal bracelet in the microwave?
     
  11. Assuming that you're not dealing with thin gold-plating or leather you can actually just use scrubbing bubbles with a long bristled brush to get in all the gunk out. I do it with my Orient, vintage Seiko, and my other metal band watches. It's worked like a charm. However, I have read and heard many times that Veraeat works really well.
     
  12. jewelery cleaner or spare toothbrush with some baking soda if its tarnished from age or whatever..if its gold plated...not too sure
     
  13. Seriously, I'm curious about this. Can you put metal in the microwave as long as it is submersed?
     
  14. Sure. The metal of the bracelet is completely submerged in soapy water so there is no arcing. It's just a quick way to heat water. I've done this for years and it never fails to upset my wife, mostly I think because of the filth that comes off the bracelet into the ramekin and the time it takes for the whole thing to sit on the counter top.
     
  15. Thanks, I never would have thought that was possible.
     
  16. I just scrub my watch down with an old tooth brush and some hot water with dish soap.
    If you want a bit of abrasion you can use some toothpaste as well.

    I do the same thing with my Leathermans (Multitools) but without the toothpaste :)
     
  17. johnniegold

    johnniegold Moderator Emeritus

    Toothbrush with some warm water and yes; toothpaste.
     
  18. With mouthwash or without :lol:
     
  19. If the watch bracelet is stainless (stainless only - no plated bracelets) put it in a solution of warm water and oxiclean and watch the dirt/wrist cheese float to the surface. When I was collecting watches I cleaned all of my Stainless bracelets this way. After soaking I rinsed them in warm water. Ask me how I know not to do this with a plated bracelet (took the gold-tone plating right off of a Seiko bracelet one time). Always take the bracelet off of the watch and don't use this solution to clean the watch. I just used mild soap/water and a baby tooth brush to clean the watch.

    Steve
     
  20. Soapy water and a toothbrush should clean it well. You can also use a half and half solution of vinegar and water, too, if it's stainless steel. For polishing, use a jeweler's cloth for amazing results.
     

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