Oil Safety Razors?

Discussion in 'Double Edged Razors' started by Bearsfan, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. This just occurred to me since I have started to amass a collection here. I have seen many rusty or pitted razors which means that they were in a situation at least once in their life where they were not used much. (and probably in a humid environment, like a bathroom) I know that you oil a straight razor after use before putting it away but I don't read much about the safety razor getting the same treatment.

    Does anyone here oil them up before putting them up on a shelf knowing that they wont be in action for a while? If so what kind of oil do you use?

    I was thinking about using Breakfree CLP because I have it lying around already. Being made for firearms I would think that it would be fine for razors.
     
  2. The general concensus and wisdom here is to use mineral oil/baby oil for several good reasons. There is an excellent recent post here regarding the details of M.O. Search this forum for "Mineral".
     
  3. I oil mine once a month.
     
  4. I do it, when I clean a twist to open razor I spray the inside mechanics with WD40 to lubricate and protect from water. Other razors get a dab of water resistant grease on the threads so the screws don't rust/wear out.
    On the inside of the head I use some petroleum jelly (vaseline) so the blades don't stick or when the blade rusts it doesn't take the head with it.
    Maybe overkill but as a razor is just a mechanical piece of hardware used in a moist/wet environment I keep doing it.
    Just don't overdo it so the razor becomes all greasy especially with sensitive skin, that's why baby oil (skin friendly) is often recommended here.
     
  5. malocchio

    malocchio Contributor

    ballistol is a fine protectant,and earth friendly...
     
  6. I've taken to using Rem Oil on the threads of my two piece and there piece razors. The reason being here awhile back I was changing the blade in my Barberpole and I found it a little bit too hard to twist it free. Once I got it apart I checked the threads and noticed a bit of green corrosion (verdigris).
     
  7. I might think that any commercially made lubricant for firearms and other uses would be or could be not for use on the skin. My own opinion would be to stick with mineral oil or a similar natural product.
     
  8. I found something similar with the threads of my Lord, not verdigris, but definitely oxidizing on the threads and causing them to bind.
    Since I was in the bathroom, I reached for the vaseline.
     
  9. If there is a problem getting gun oil on the skin there would be tons of gun owners with problems. If you own and use a gun you get gun oil on you. I play the trumpet and tuba and you will get valve oil on ya also.


    If you just wipe the excess off the razor you aint gonna be getting much on you. Its not like we are suggesting using gun oil as a preshave.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2011
  10. Same here. First of the month. Prior I do a good cleaning because I only do a water rinse after each shave, with air dry. After a good cleaning I dab a few drops oil (lubricating oil) and smear it all over with my finger and let sit over night on a paper towel. Since it was smeared and lightly greased only it should be practically dry of any oil the next day. Works on my stainless steel razor.
     
  11. I don't know if it's the same gun oil in use worldwide, but I'm ex UK Military, and the oil we used; you're supposed to wash yourself thoroughly before eating / drinking anything, as it is quite bad for you. Given that a razor will inevitably end up near the mouth, I'd say it's probably a bad life choice to use gun oil, if it's the same stuff worldwide, which I have no idea on, given that it just came in little unmarked tins, so I can't tell you the brand or anything like that.

    Personally; I don't use anything, and haven't had any issues with my razor as yet, but if I do; I'll be sure to let you know, and to share whatever I deem fit to use on it, but I think the consensus of using baby oil sounds about right to me. It'll waterproof it just as well as any other oil, just won't be as hard wearing. Also; gun oil smells awful, so unless you're immune to that smell, I certainly wouldn't recommend it.
     
  12. :scared:

    I love the smell of Hoppes #9 and Breakfree CLP.

    Smells like freedom......
     
  13. hah hah, sounds like I have yet more exploration to do when I get myself a shiny new rifle!!! So used to "NATO issue" you kinda zone that there are other products sometimes, fortunately, my new found obsession with shaving has taken the (less expensive) precedence at the moment, as that was more important as I really wanted to alleviate the dastardly shaving rash... works a treat too!
     
  14. I only oil the threads up. Nothing else. Im not really worried about the health effects of the Rem oil since I work in Auto service shop and I am in contact with grease,used motor oil,brake dust,lead all day.

    Heck one day I got a nice used oil facial mask because the idiot engineers that designed the Dodge Nitro gave you almost no room to get to the freaking oil filter. Well on the way out of the access "crack"(because you just couldn't pull it straight out) I accidentally tipped the filter over and of course I was looking right at the thing and took a shellacking. From just below the eyes and down was covered in oil.
     

  15. Women spend all the money to smell nice. They only do that for each other cause if they did it for men a bottle of hoppes # 9
     
  16. why not--Gun oil loves my face
     
  17. I just clean with scrubbing bubbles once a week. Don't use oil altho I have used WD-40 when the turning mechanism starts to get belligerent.
     
  18. Safety razors don't rust, with only a couple exceptions they're made of brass and/or zamak.
    And they really don't need to be oiled, they were designed to function without it and have lasted a half century or more just fine.
    In fact, oil will often attract and collect dirt, causing the works to get gummed up quicker than otherwise.
     
  19. Periodically cleaning and reoiling and you should not have any gumming up problems. Any metal on metal moving surface should have some kind of lubrication.
     

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